You Can Take Her Home Now by Anna Jefferson

Out today green

You Can Take Her Home Now by Anna Jefferson

 

44031173Publisher: Orion

Publishing Date: 21st March 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 352

Genre: General Fiction, Parenting, Humour

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Paperback (out on 16.05.2019)

 

Synopsis:

Hilariously funny and excruciatingly relatable – perfect for fans of THE UNMUMSY MUM, Louise Pentland and Gill Sims.

Emily is sure she’s getting this baby stuff all wrong. Why does everyone else look like they’re smashing motherhood when she’s barely made it out of her maternity leggings and out of the house?

Her other half tries to say all the right things (can’t he just keep making her toast?). Her mum is brilliant (but on the other side of the country). Her two new mum-friends seem to feel like misfits too – but there’s really just one person she wants to open up to . . . only Emily hasn’t spoken to her for fifteen years.

Lonely but not alone, Emily’s about to discover that when you’re starting a family, what you really need are your friends.

Rating: five-stars

 

Emily has just become a mum. She’s overwhelmed with love to her little daughter Lucy but she’s also full of fear – is she doing all the things right or wrong? Is she a good mum? Is this NORMAL that sometimes she dreams of being single and childless again…? Her boyfriend tries to help as well as he can but oh well, he’s almost all the time at work, right? Of course, Emily’s old friends don’t have children so they don’t know what she’s going through – there is one person who could understand her but they haven’t spoken for fifteen years… Emily sets her mind on making new friends and trying to get this whole parenting malarkey under control – but will she manage? 

I loved Emily – from the very beginning, in the labour ward, she felt like my best friend. We have the same way of thinking, she reacted similarly to me in so many situations, we felt the same – she was actually me after I’ve had my baby. . She told how it really is to feel so low, to be angry without a reason with those that you are supposed to love most, how confusing it is to be so… confused, and that really, nobody can prepare you for this what’s to come when your baby arrives. And this all was written in such a brilliant, light – hearted and uplifting way. Of course, I couldn’t help but fell for Emily, feel her pain and confusion and then you I wanted to cheer her on, to give her a pat on her back and tell her that she’s doing a great job and that I’ve been there, I’ve seen this and thank you for telling this out loud.  

What I also liked was the fact that the author didn’t focus so much on Lucy – she was there, of course, and she was adorable, but it was actually a book about Emily. Even though she had a feeling that everybody around her asks her only about Lucy, that every single sentence starts with Lucy and not with her, it was a story about Emily, and I loved it. And the book had a plot! Yes! It was not only about the early parenthood but there were also some twists and turns and unpleasant surprises on the way, and this worked perfectly well together. It touched upon family dynamics, relationships and friendship in a great, down to earth way. And it made me laugh out loud. And I mean, really. So loud that my daughter was asking me what am I reading and can I read it to her too – of course I did! And she laughed as well. How can you not laugh when Emily accidentally high – fived the doctor for example? Or wanted to hurt her boyfriend with a paper – cut on his forehead? Brilliant, simply brilliant things, small things but so accurate and so sharply written, and with my kind of humour. 

This lovely, charming novel perfectly slots into the trend of books about parenthood. You could roll your eyes and say, not another book about a new mum, but believe me, guys, “You Can Take Her Home Now” is absolutely refreshing, hilarious and yes, of course, also brutally honest but it’s a read with a difference as well.


Altogether “You Can Take Her Home Now” was a perfectly relatable book and no matter if you’re a parent or not, you should simply read it! As a mum, I could easily relate to Emily, as a non – parent you will easily enjoy the humour and hilariousness of some of the events and the brilliant, chatty writing style. The story shows that you can’t do a bad job as a parent, so really, don’t worry too much, and if you’re too deep in the dark, dark hole don’t be afraid to admit it. I can whole – heartedly recommend this true – to – life and overwhelmingly feel – good story to you. 

 

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Absolutely Smashing It by Kathryn Wallace

Absolutely Smashing It by Kathryn Wallace

 

41uiiujq7vl._sx309_bo1204203200_Publisher: Sphere

Publishing Date: 7th March 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 320

Genre: General Fiction, Parenting, Humour

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Hardcover | Paperback (out on 09.01.2020)

 

Synopsis:

***Unmissable, hilarious and kind, this is the first novel from Kathryn Wallace, who blogs as I Know, I Need to Stop Talking***

“SAM! AVA! Get downstairs, NOW. Have you done your TEETH? HAIR? SHOES? Come on, come on, come on, we’re going to be bastarding late again. No, I haven’t seen Lego Optimus Prime, and nor do I give a shit about his whereabouts. Sam, will you stop winding your sister up and take this model of the Shard that I painstakingly sat up and created for you last night so that I wouldn’t be in trouble with your teacher. I mean, so that you wouldn’t be in trouble with your teacher. No, it doesn’t smell of ‘dirty wine’. Well, maybe it does a little bit. Look, Sam, I haven’t got time to argue. Just hold your nose and get in the car, okay? AVA! TEETH! HAIR! SHOES!”

Gemma is only just holding it together – she’s a single parent, she’s turning 40 and her seven-year-old daughter has drawn a cruelly accurate picture which locates Gemma’s boobs somewhere around her knees. So when her new next-door neighbour, Becky, suggests that Gemma should start dating again, it takes a lot of self-control not to laugh in her face.

But Becky is very persuasive and before long Gemma finds herself juggling a full-time job, the increasingly insane demands of the school mums’ Facebook group and the tricky etiquette of a new dating world. Not only that, but Gemma has to manage her attraction to her daughter’s teacher, Tom, who has swapped his life in the City for teaching thirty six to seven year olds spelling, grammar, basic fractions – and why it’s not ok to call your classmate a stinky poo-bum…

It’s going to be a long year – and one in which Gemma and Becky will learn a really crucial lesson: that in the end, being a good parent is just about being good enough.

Rating: five-stars

 

Gemma is a single parent, after her husband (Nick the Dick) decided to go on an adventure of his life (with his secretary), juggling a full – time job and all the usual things you have to juggle in your everyday life. She’s turning forty soon, her boobs are somewhere around her knees on her daughter’s picture and of course she didn’t know she should read at least one hour with her children during the Christmas break… Then Becky moves next – door and they hit it off immediately. She tries to persuade Gemma to start dating again and she’s very persuasive – and so they make a pact that before Gemma turns 40 she will finally have sex and for Becky to land a perfect job.
It’s going to be a long, long year for both Gemma and Becky, what with disastrous dates, job interviews, school, homework and dogs…

I loved Gemma from the very beginning, she was just my kind of girl. Honest, genuine, without beating around the bush, telling things how they really are. She didn’t always manage to make all the things right, she often forgot things and this is why I wanted to high – five her, as she so reminded me of myself. I am also not perfect. I liked her friendship with Becky, who was like a breath of fresh air, albeit very quick and loud breath, also telling the truth direct into your face, no matter if you wanted to hear it or not.
I absolutely, totally loved Gemma’s dates and I am really, really sad that there were only a few of them put in the story. They were hilarious and I could probably read a whole new book only about Gemma’s adventurous meetings.
I also liked that the author didn’t only concentrate on Gemma but also took Becky under scrutiny as well and her struggles to find a job. You could think, Becky, so privileged, with nothing to worry about, successful husband at her side, a total liability of a dog as well, and I really, really applauded her desire to find herself a job. There comes a moment when you simply can’t stand sitting at home and you need to feel like a competent human being again. Becky’s adventures with finding the right place were not only hilarious but also – let’s admit it – sad and awfully relatable, but they only made the book more valuable and real. And I can of course remember taking my daughter to two interviews – however both times I’ve got the job so perhaps she’s brought me luck, but also both of those jobs were to work with children so maybe she was like a bonus point?

I really liked the writing style. It was so light and relatable, and the author has such a great way with words, and her writing is absolutely addictive. It has made me laugh out loud, nodding my head with understanding, roll my eyes and shake my head with disbelief. I must admit, my daughter was thanks god a very brave toddler and small child in comparison to so many others, nevertheless so many situations just rang a bell and it felt so personal. Though I must say that it’s getting serious now as she’s just started school and the whole school runs start to resemble those described by the author – cliques and ignoring each other is just normal. Hallelujah for ma daughter going to school by bus, really – I’m done, those few times that I had to go to school and meet some other parents.
The end of this story was, however, just too fairy tale – ish for me, to be honest. I like a happy end, but this one just too happy in my eyes, and I know, the characters have been struggling through the whole book and sure, they all deserved their own piece of happiness eventually but I’m just saying. As the whole story was so down to earth and so scarily relatable, the end seemed simply too soppy.

It was a hilarious, brutally honest and relatable story that I absolutely and whole – heartedly enjoyed. Personally I can read those funny stories about the challenges of parenthood and #FML moments over and over again, simply because they show me that I. Am. Not. Alone in all this parenthood malarkey, that there are others going through exactly the same things. Brilliantly funny but not too overdone, it was a perfect read for me. Highly recommended!

She Lies in Wait by Gytha Lodge / Blog Tour

She Lies in Wait by Gytha Lodge

 

40232703Publisher: Michael Joseph

Publishing Date: 21st March 2019

Series: DCI Jonah Sheens #1

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 384

Genre: Mystery & Thrillers

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Hardcover | Paperback (out on 10.01.20)

 

Synopsis:

Get ready for the biggest crime debut of 2019…

Six friends. One killer. Who do you trust?

“A dark, deep, terrific thriller and a scorching portrait of friendship and its betrayal” Nicci French

On a hot July night in 1983, six school friends go camping in the forest. Bright and brilliant, they are destined for great things, and young Aurora Jackson is dazzled to be allowed to tag along.

Thirty years later, a body is discovered. DCI Sheens is called to the scene, but he already knows what’s waiting for him: Aurora Jackson, found at long last.

But that’s not all. The friends have all maintained their innocence, but the body is found in a hideaway only the six of them knew about.

It seems the killer has always lurked very close to home…

Rating: four-stars

 

“She Lies in Wait” has a brilliant synopsis. In July 1983, six teenagers go camping in the woods, but only 5 come back. The 14 – year – old Aurora is missing – her sleeping bag is empty and cold. What has happened? Where has she gone? Who last saw her? Is she alive?
Thirty years later, remains are found in the same wood. Soon it’s confirmed that it’s Aurora Jackson. DCI Sheens and his murder squad re – open the case and start investigation. It soon becomes clear that all members of the group that went camping are hiding truth and that there was much more happening as they first told. Was one of them the killer? Or was there someone else involved?

The story is told in alternating time – lines and the events take place on 23rd July 1983 – it’s my birthday. We slowly experience what happened during the camping trip and 30 years later, with the investigation being open again after the remains of Aurora have been found, watching Jonah and his team investigating. And it was not an easy task, what with the disappearance happening so many years earlier. The past tells us what has happened on this day and introduces us more to Aurora’s character – a very compelling one.

I know that some of the bloggers say that they knew almost immediately what the mystery is but I, well, I didn’t know. Yes, that’s me, the worst and slowest logical thinker in the world, I think I wouldn’t make a great inspector. Honestly, till the very end, when the reveal came and face palmed me I didn’t know who it was – and it’s great, really, that the book kept me in darkness for so long.

I liked this book, really liked, but I wanted it to engage me more, as I’ve never felt a part of this story, and I also couldn’t connect with the characters. Actually, all the time one of the friends was mentioned I wasn’t sure who it was and to whom they belonged – especially the male characters, those two that their names began with “B”, I really didn’t know which one of them is the athlete and who’s the politician. And then a Daniel? Was he one of the “Bs”? I am really not sure what has happened here, why I had those problems, can’t explain them – it’s probably one of the things. And I also missed the tension a bit – the book was not as dark and full of surprising twists as I’d hoped it could be – on the other hand, now I’m writing this, it didn’t have to be tense and dark, so everything is okay here. But the writing was very good, the writing style is the one that immediately draws you in and makes you intrigued, it was flowing and seamless, and I was glued to the pages, so that’s a good sign, right?

The characters seemed unengaged, not interested in what has happened with Aurora, and maybe because of the relatively huge number of them we weren’t given the opportunity to really get to know them, deep, and to find their motives. It looks like each person is protecting the other, not telling truth, trying to hide things and forgetting that it’s about murder. On the other hand, DCI Sheens and his squad were interesting characters, and I really liked their work ethics. They also perfectly complemented each other.

“She Lies in Wait” was a slow burner, a methodical and well build and plotted book. It was thoroughly planned and I had a feeling that every detail in this story was very well considered and that nothing unnecessary wasn’t put into this stale. You shan’t expect many “wow” – moments in this story but on the other hand the way it was written, its slow tempo, the hard core police procedures was addictive and I simply enjoyed it very much. It is a clever, multi – layered book and I desperately wanted to uncover every single layer, heck, it doesn’t happen often guys but I wanted to have a look at the last page to see whodunit – I resisted, of course, but the more thrilling it was to discover the truth. Recommended!

 

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One Summer’s Night byKiley Dunbar / Blog Tour

One Summer’s Night by Kiley Dunbar

 

43721993Publisher: Hera Books

Publishing Date: 6th March 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher via NetGalley, thank you!

Number of pages: 374

Genre: Romance

 Buy the Book:  Kindle

 

Synopsis:

The path of true love never did run smooth…did it?

Kelsey Anderson is stuck in a rut so big, she’ll need a 4-wheel drive to get out. She’s just been made redundant from her dead-end job, and boyfriend Fran is so busy climbing up the career ladder that he’s forgotten how to have fun. She needs to change her life – and fast.

Stumbling across an advert for tour guides in Stratford-Upon-Avon seems like the perfect way to bring the sunshine back. In an impulsive move, she moves from her small Scottish village to Shakespeare’s birthplace, armed only with a suitcase and her battered copy of Shakespeare’s Sonnets.

Kelsey quickly falls in love with the place, her job as a tourist guide allowing her to explore every inch of the picture-perfect town, from cosy cafes to the picturesque banks of the river.

But it’s not just the town that captures her heart, as she finds herself torn between the actors Will and Jonathan who both vie for her affections.

But will beautiful Peony, the lead actress at the Oklahoma theatre company where Jonathan is playing Oberon in A Midsummer’s Night’s Dream, play a role in keeping Kelsey and Jonathan apart?

Or will flirtatious, charming Will, the fellow tour guide who has set his sights on Kelsey, keep the star-crossed lovers from finding their happy ending?

A gorgeously uplifting, feel good romance that will captivate readers of Holly Martin, Cathy Bramley and Milly Johnson.

my-review

 

Kelsey Anderson finds herself in a rut. She’s just lost her job in a camera shop that she truly loved, her long – term relationship with Francis seems to be going downhill and she really doesn’t know what it is she wants to do with her life. She loves taking pictures, she loves Shakespeare and her fondest memory is this of her last holiday as a family in Stratford – Upon – Avon when her dad was still alive. So when she notices an offer to work as a tour guide in Shakespeare’s birthplace what has she got to loose? It’s only for a summer and maybe after this time they will be able to solve their problems with Francis? Her family and her best friend Mirren encourage her to make this move, Francis is not so thrilled… But as it’s only a temporary position, she decides to go.

I absolutely loved the idea of Kelsey working as a tour – guide. I still can’t forget Molly Hopkins’s Evie Dexter’s series, and it’s years since I’ve read them, and they were a real hit, and I hoped for something very similar with “One Summer’s Night”. I really liked the few rounds of sight – seeing that we got, the interaction with the tourist and the way they were organized and I’d love to read more about them. There were hilarious tourists, some embarrassing situations and the eclectic group of the tourist guides – a lovely idea that felt a little too underdeveloped in comparison to Kelsey’s love life and the many things Shakespeare. The author has really well captured the “Olde English” feeling of the place and vividly and scintillatingly described all the places, bringing them to life.

Kelsey was the main character and she was lovely and full of warmth, though I had a feeling that mentally she’s much younger than her age. I liked her relationship with her family but I wanted more maturity there to be honest, and it felt as if she was sheltered from everything her whole life. Yes, of course, she had her own amount of grief in her young life and my heart went for her but the amount of her sobbing in the book was overwhelming. However, she was a good – hearted person, too easily jumping to conclusions and too quickly withdrawing when there was something happening in her life that didn’t go according to plan, and she would be even better a character with a little dose of self – belief, as she was counting on other people’s help too often. She was just a normal girl but it was probably this normality that made her feel so real and likeable – stuck in a rut, not sure what to do with her life and how to do it, uncertain, her dreams of photography long forgotten, her relationship rather stagnant but better such relationship than none, right? But there was still life in the girl, and even though she’s full of fear, she decides to take the opportunity of the tour guide job. Often questioning herself and her abilities but always finding strength in the end to stay upbeat, to find the courage and it was nice to see her eventually finding her feet and making up her mind, making decision.
The other characters were a group of eclectic, colourful people, perhaps too cartoonish sometimes but still likeable and entertaining.

I enjoyed the writing style, it is very vivid and eloquent, and chatty and also somehow poetic and lyrical – an unusual combination but it works wonders here. I could feel the heat of the midsummer, so vivid was it described, and the descriptions of the town were beautiful – it was a lovely escapism. However, eventually, the whole story started to feel too one – dimensional, too flat and honestly a bit too predictable, too clichéd, too neat. I had a feeling when reading it that I’ve been there and I’ve seen it all.

“One Summer’s Night” covered swelteringly hot summer in Stratford – Upon – Avon, romance, affairs, a great amount of confusion and jumping to conclusions so if you’re looking for an easy, predictable romance with straightforward characters, it’s a book for you. It was a warm, feel – good and uplifting read with some unforgettable moments and gorgeous descriptions.

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The Scandal by Mari Hannah / Blog Tour

The Scandal by Mari Hannah

 

43881946Publisher: Orion

Publishing Date: 7th March 2019

Series: Stone & Oliver Book #3

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 432

Genre: Mystery & Thrillers

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

When a young man is found stabbed to death in a side street in Newcastle city centre in the run up to Christmas, it looks like a botched robbery to DCI David Stone. But when DS Frankie Oliver arrives at the crime scene, she gets more than she bargained for.

She IDs the victim as Herald court reporter, thirty-two-year old Chris Adams she’s known since they were kids. With no eyewitnesses, the MIT are stumped. They discover that when Adams went out, never to return, he was working on a scoop that would make his name. But what was the story he was investigating? And who was trying to cover it up?

As detectives battle to solve the case, they uncover a link to a missing woman that turns the investigation on its head. The exposé has put more than Adams’ life in danger. And it’s not over yet.

Rating: four-stars

 

Frankie Oliver is called to a murder scene. After arriving, she’s horrified, as she recognizes the victim – it’s her childhood friend Chris Adams. He’s a journalist, now stabbed to death, and while his death initially looks like a robbery gone wrong, further investigation implies that he was working on a big story. Frankie and David Stone start to suspect that there is much more to this case.

“The Scandal” by Mari Hannah is the third book in the Stone and Oliver series, however it can be read as a stand – alone. I haven’t read the previous books before – and I’m going to catch up with them as soon as possible, this is the greatest thing in being a book blogger I think, all the time discovering new authors/books/series and knowing that you’re for a great read.

The novel is told mostly from Frankie Oliver’s point of view and I immediately warmed to her. She has a great personality and a distinctive voice and she’s the right person in the right place, her passion to her job is palpable. Her relationship with David Stone works really well, I liked their banter and their verbal battles and the fact they weren’t afraid to say what they think.

Mostly the books are over – described. I mean, every single detail is meticulously described, all the feelings and emotions are turned upside down, there is no room for the reader’s imagination. “The Scandal” was, however, different – it was very dialogue – driven, the characters talked and talked and talked, and I absolutely loved this variation. It made the book dynamic, quick and there were enough information in those dialogues. Also, it doesn’t mean that there weren’t enough details, because Mari Hannah’s attention to them is absolutely excellent, only she doesn’t overwhelm us with miniscule descriptions. They are vivid enough, they contain enough information but there is also space left for the reader. I totally loved the way she has explained all the police procedures, their meetings etc – it felt like watching a film, the banter between the characters, being able to follow their way of thinking, seeing how they’re working. This story wis fast – paced and often it goes towards things that I would never expect, full of twists and turns. It gradually starts to make links between the murdered journalist and the missing woman and from that moment on the book gains ever more pace, and I adored the fact that it was simply unpredictable in which way it’s going to take us. There came a moment that I stopped guessing and let the author take me on a journey and waited relaxed for all the puzzle pieces to fell into their places.

The author touches upon many issues in this story. She provides a fresh, different perspective at those that were forced into homelessness and at the abuse of the elder members of the society. I thoroughly enjoyed this novel, but probably my most favourite parts were the police procedural – they were simply so vivid that I had a feeling I’m a witness to all of those procedures.
Mari Hannah can so well capture all the feelings and emotions of her characters. The terror, fright, despair and grief were brilliantly brought to the pages, and the tension was visible. Also, the investigation itself is so well written, we’re starting with nothing, with no witnesses, no point of reference and it slowly builds and builds, starting with a small snowball and ending with an avalanche. The plotting is tight and clever, there are no leaking places, it’s logical yet still full of surprises. I’ll be for sure recommending “The Scandal” and reading other Hannah’s books.

 

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A Wedding at the Comfort Food Cafe by Debbie Johnson

A Wedding at the Comfort Food Cafe by Debbie Johnson

 

41836467Publisher: HarperImpulse

Publishing Date: 7th March 2019

Series: Comfort Food Cafe #6

Source:  Received from the publisher via NetGalley, thank you!

Number of pages: 252

Genre: Women’s Fiction, Romance

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Paperback (out on 21.03.2019)

 

Synopsis:

Wedding bells ring out in Budbury as the Comfort Food Café and its cosy community of regulars are gearing up for a big celebration…

But Auburn Longville doesn’t have time for that! Between caring for her poorly mum, moving in with her sister and running the local pharmacy, life is busy enough – and it’s about to get busier. Chaos arrives in the form of a figure from her past putting her quaint village life and new relationship with gorgeous Finn Jensen in jeopardy. It’s time for Auburn to face up to some life changing decisions.

Settle in for a slice of wedding cake at the Comfort Food Café – a place where friendships are made for life and nobody ever wants to leave.

Rating: five-stars

 

Auburn, the former wild child, has settled in Budbury. She, with the brilliant red hair, still tries to stop smoking and sometimes drinks too much, but she’s happy in her skin – finally. Her relationship with the gorgeous Finn is going from strength to strength and really, everything looks peachy. That is, until one day, one shock revelation sees the light of day and an unexpected visitor arrives – and this sends Auburn back to her reckless day in Spain. She starts to question her choices – shall she stay in Budbury? Did she really change or is she still, deep down in heart, looking for adventures?

I love the Comfort Food Cafe series, and I am also the one always telling that the cafe should be real, and I think I will miss the characters but I also think that it’s the best time to stop the series now – the author can so beautifully and gorgeously explore all kinds of feelings, she can so well write about emotions, and the way the characters are able to speak about it all is truly amazing but I simply think that the lovely formula has just run out. Though I will be the first in the virtual queue to put my hand high and admit that I’d love to hear more from Laura – especially Laura. The author has also told us at the beginning of the book how she sees the characters in the future – and as much as I loved reading it, for me they should all simply stay in Budbury. They just belong there and make the place so great.

This story was as well filled with larger than life characters, real feelings, delicious cakes, wild parties, tons of dramas and troubles, and this all written in this gorgeous, chatty, humorous writing style. Those books brought me so much joy and happy tears, as they were so warm and inviting, and full of the overwhelming feel – good factor. The way they are written is absolutely inimitable but I think that those were the characters that made the series so exceptional and special – loveable, real and realistic.

As usual the main character, and this time we get a focus on Willow’s sister Auburn, has secrets she hides, problems and skeletons in the closet. However, as it usually happens, the secrets have a habit of catching up with you. I quickly learnt that there is always much more to Debbie Johnson’s characters than meet the eye, that you can’t judge them, that you simply have to give them time, and it was the same with Auburn. What I really liked in her was the fact that she was totally honest, that she didn’t want to hide her feelings, that she wanted to be frank with Finn.

I raced through the pages of “A Wedding at the Comfort Food Cafe”, as always, enjoying the gossip and characters’ antics. Reading this book was like being back with your best friends, you really know the characters so well. They feel so real because they are moving, growing, maturing, changing, they become children and it feels like a wheel of life, like there is someone who’s going to continue the characters’ work, who’s going to keep the place going. They care about each other and they are so honest and altruistic and you simply feel like a part of their gang. Shortly – it was another book about the power of friendship and trust, about second chances and love. Gorgeous and utterly compelling and I highly recommend it to you all.

 

The Trouble with Rose by Amita Murray

The Trouble with Rose by Amita Murray

 

43239335Publisher: Harper Collins

Publishing Date: 14th February 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher via NetGalley, thank you!

Number of pages: 400

Genre: General Fiction (Adult)

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Paperback (out on 16.05.2019)

 

Synopsis:

A missing sister. A broken heart.
A whole lot of trouble…

Perfect for fans of Marian Keyes, The Trouble with Rose is an unforgettable story about a messy family, a big secret at its heart, and the unbreakable bond between sisters.

Rilla is getting married. Except she isn’t. She’s running away – from her confused fiancé Simon, her big mad family, and the memories nipping at her heels.

Her sister Rose would know what to do in such times of crisis.

But the trouble is, Rose is the crisis. She disappeared years ago, and Rilla’s heart went missing too.

Where is Rose? And who is Rilla without Rose?

If she’s to rescue some happiness out of all this chaos, she needs to find out.

Rating: three-stars

 

Rilla is about to get married to Simon but shortly before the wedding ceremony she’s arrested for shoplifting. Yes. Her own and Simon’s family manage to get her out of prison but Rilla isn’t happy, she can’t settle, she’s consumed with guilt about her sister Rose who has disappeared 16 years ago. Talking about Rose is forbidden in Rilla’s family but she can’t find peace until she knows what has happened. She needs to find her sister.

Personally I had huge problems with the main character. She came across as very spoiled and childish and all the time wanting something, whingy and unhappy. Rilla’s actions weren’t sweet for me, and she was mostly passive – aggressive and simply I couldn’t warm to her. Indecisive and behaving as if the whole world should revolve around her, with demanding attitude and not too likeable – and this hugely busted this story for me. I know, you don’t have to like the main character to enjoy the book but this time, as this story was very main character driven, it simply didn’t work. She’s convinced that it’s her fault that Rose disappeared, as she was mean and rude to her sister – but to be honest, she was like this to every living person in her proximity. It wasn’t funny anymore, it wasn’t charming, it was simply not nice. Although the way Rilla suffered because of all those secrets, of being kept in darkness was brilliantly described, and we could easily see that she felt isolated, she started to have panic attacks, she was struggling in every aspect of her life, and it wasn’t easy to watch – I wanted her to succeed in solving the Rose’s mystery, and I was also intrigued what has happened to her.
On the other hand, I adored her family – this huge group of eclectic and eccentric characters, they could have been annoying and interfering but you wouldn’t have to fear anything with them at your side. Loud and sarcastic and reserving the right to know everything about every other member of the family, always well meaning, I know they would drive me crazy, but as they weren’t my family I could totally enjoy them.

“The Trouble with Rose” was a book that intertwined humour with poignant moments and with different and unique storyline. I think that the search for Rose was not simply a search for Rose, that there was much more to it, it was actually Rilla also trying to work out what it is she wants to do with her life, if she’s able to love. As a result, we get a warm story about dysfunctioning family, lies and secrets and as an extra bonus there are tons of information about Indian culture and community – but it was refreshing and interesting. It was humorous, it was chaotic, and it had some brilliant moments – I, for example, adored the mentally messed up Lord Basingstoke, the cat, for whom Simon was trying to figure out parabolas. Maybe it wasn’t the right read for me, maybe I didn’t get the main character but I appreciated this novel, and I’ll be looking for more from Amita Murray.