The Bookshop on the Shore by Jenny Colgan

The Bookshop on the Shore by Jenny Colgan

 

44315343Publisher: Sphere

Publishing Date: 13th June 2019

Series: Scottish Bookshop #2

Source:  Received from the publisher in return for an honest review, thank you!

Number of pages: 432

Genre: General Fiction (Adult), Women’s Fiction

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Hardcover | Paperback (out on 06.02.2020)

 

Synopsis:

A grand baronial house on Loch Ness, a quirky small-town bookseller, and a single mom looking for a fresh start all come together in this witty and warm-hearted novel by New York Times bestselling author Jenny Colgan.

Desperate to escape from London, single mother Zoe wants to build a new life for herself and her son Hari. She can barely afford the crammed studio apartment on a busy street where honking horns and shouting football fans keep them awake all night. If she doesn’t find a way out soon, Zoe knows it’s just a matter of time before she has a complete meltdown. On a whim, she answers an ad for a nanny job in the Scottish Highlands, which is about as far away from the urban crush of London as possible. It sounds heavenly!

The job description asks for someone capable of caring for three “gifted children”, two of which behave feral wolverines. The children’s widowed father is a wreck, and the kids run wild in a huge tumbledown castle on the heather-strewn banks of Loch Ness. Still, the peaceful, picturesque location is everything London is not—and Zoe rises to the challenges of the job.

With the help of Nina, the friendly local bookseller, Zoe begins to put down roots in the community. Are books, fresh air, and kindness enough to heal this broken family—and her own…?

 

Rating: five-stars

but-i-needmy-girls

 

Zoe is a single mum, struggling to bring up her son Hari in a tiny bed-sit in Wembley. Hari is a lovely 4 – year – old boy, but he can’t speak – at all. His father never seems to have money to help, so when Zoe’s landlord raises the rent on the flat and then the opportunity of a job as a nanny and a bookseller in the remote Scottish village arises, she doesn’t hesitate long. However, Zoe quickly learns that the three children she should look after have recently gone through 6 nannies and are determined to get rid of the 7th, immediately. The bookshop’s customers simply rely on Nina, the owner, to know which books they want to read and Zoe has no idea. Was this a mistake to move so far away from her old life?

Jenny Colgan is one of the best storytellers ever, period. Her writing style is exceptional, chatty and so natural, and there is always so much humour and wisdom in her words. Each time when reading her book I simply feel better, as if the book and characters were hugging me, making me feel better and more optimistic. It is also her unique talent to transport the reader into the setting of her stories, this time to the beautiful, wild Scottish Highlands – the descriptions are incredibly gorgeous and vivid and you immediately feel like being there, seeing rather than reading.

The characters, as always, were a perfect mix of personalities, all with such distinctive voices and all bringing so much to the story. I loved reading about Zoe and Hari, even though their lives are not like a garden full of roses. I actually immediately warmed to her and she was instantly growing on me more and more.
The children were simply hilarious, in their own ways, all already struck by the reality of life in different ways and Zoe is determined to help them all to get out of their shells, to enjoy life, even though it’s not too easy, especially at the beginning, and she has to struggle to earn their trust. She quickly realises that the children simply feel abandon and they are hurting, and their father is so remote that he might as well not be there at all. She knows that what the children need is love and attention, and I loved how right she was in her assumptions, and how much she tried to give them boundaries, rules and love.

What I also adored so much in this story is the sheer love of books and reading shining through the pages. There are so many quotes from some great books and it was brilliant, and the books really felt like characters of their own.

The element of the mystery was there as well, and the author also touches upon mental health issues, of course in a sensitive, gentle way, but she also writes about those things as if they were the most normal things in the world – which they are. There is also the issue of a patchwork family dynamics, the way it can affect us all but also how much it can give us, and really, no matter what Jenny Colgan writes about, it is simply brilliant.

“The Bookshop on the Shore” was charming, uplifting and so incredibly poignant story with quirky and sharp characters and there is so much more to it then a simple romance: problems, troubles, mayhem and humour, struggles of being a single parent, particularly to a child with some issues, about unconditional love and simply being strong. I loved every single word of this book and I can’t recommend it highly enough!

 

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Half a World Away by Mike Gayle

Half a World Away by Mike Gayle

 

cover155084-mediumPublisher: Hodder & Stoughton

Publishing Date: 13th June 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher in return for an honest review, thank you!

Number of pages: 352

Genre: General Fiction

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Hardcover

| Paperback (out on 05.03.2020)

 

Synopsis:

The incredibly moving and uplifting new novel from the author of The Man I Think I Know.

Kerry Hayes knows exactly who she is: a single mum, a cleaner and Mariah Carey’s biggest fan.

Noah Martineau thinks he knows who he is: a successful barrister, with a wife, daughter and big house in Primrose Hill.

Strangers with nothing in common.
Strangers living worlds apart.

But it wasn’t always this way…and Noah and Kerry are about to discover just who they really are.

Rating: five-stars

 

Kerry is a hardworking single mother, raising her beloved son Kian. Life for her has never been easy. She was put into care as a child and changed foster families like you change your gloves, ending up in a home. Getting pregnant after few years of reckless and dangerous living made Kerry change her perspectives. She was determined to give her son the loving, stable home she has never had, even if his father is not interested in him. The only other person that Kerry has loved as much as her son was her little brother Jason, taken into care and then being adopted. Unable to find him, Kerry started to write letters to him via adoption agency. However, Jason is now Noah Martineau, adopted into a white middle class family, and he has been given any opportunity that he cleverly took the chance. He’s a barrister with his own perfect family, or at least it looks like this, and he actually never wanted to know about his previous life. So when a litter from Kerry arrives, he couldn’t be more than surprised. Will he get in touch with his sister? He has no idea that for Kerry it may be the matter of life and death.

In this character – driven novel the characterisation is absolutely perfect. It is told from Kerry and Noah’s perspectives, and they both have distinctive, strong voices. The way they tell their story makes you quickly immersed and engaged in their lives and I immediately found myself rooting for them both, sitting at the edge of my seat and biting my nails. Kerry was absolutely brilliant, down – to – earth, realistic characters, who, despite life not being a garden full of roses, didn’t lose her sparkle, her love to colours and Mariah Carey. Noah was great, clever and realistic, and there so much to him that you could think at first.
Watching their relationship develop was like an emotional rollercoaster ride, with all its ups and downs, so incredibly uplifting but also sad, as there were so many challenges thrown under their feet. It was moving, it was poignant and it simply felt SO. REAL.

It was absolutely Mike Gayle at his best – he’s back in the best form ever and “Half a World Away” only shows his real talent. It is a book that’s going to pull you in immediately from the start, a story that’s going to break your heart and give you tons of hope. It’s emotional, it’s full of feelings, heart and soul, it’s bitter – sweet, raw and honest, brilliantly written and touching family saga with a difference.
It was a beautiful, tugging at the heart – strings but also not too wishy – washy and overdone story about family dynamics, about choices, letting go and learning to hold on. The author touched upon many difficult issues but he does it with easy humour and gentleness, and this plus the great characterisation made me feel a part of this story. Mike Gayle is a great observer of a human nature and he can effortlessly and eloquently put his observations into words. Actually, guys, you should simply treat yourself and read it the book asap. Highly recommended!

 

Her Husband’s Mistake by Sheila O’Flanagan / Blog Tour

Her Husband’s Mistake by Sheila O’Flanagan

 

43204746Publisher: Headline

Publishing Date: 30th May 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher in return for an honest review, thank you!

Number of pages: 448

Genre: Women’s Fiction

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Hardcover | Paperback (out on 05.03. 2020)

 

Synopsis:

Dave’s made a BIG mistake. What’s Roxy going to do about it? The riveting new novel from No. 1 bestselling author Sheila O’Flanagan. Perfect for readers of Marian Keyes and Amanda Prowse.

Roxy’s marriage has always been rock solid.

After twenty years, and with two carefree kids, she and Dave are still the perfect couple.

Until the day she comes home unexpectedly, and finds Dave in bed with their attractive, single neighbour.

Suddenly Roxy isn’t sure about anything – her past, the business she’s taken over from her dad, or what her family’s future might be. She’s spent so long caring about everyone else that she’s forgotten what she actually wants. But something has changed. And Roxy has a decision to make.

Whether it’s with Dave, or without him, it’s time for Roxy to start living for herself…

‘One of my favourite authors’ Marian Keyes

Rating: four-stars

 

Roxy has recently lost her father and has been spending more time at her mother’s house. The day after the funeral she comes home to surprise her husband, however what she sees when she walks in to their bedroom is going to change their lives. Roxy immediately moves out with the children and stays with her mother to work out what to do next. She has started to run her father’s chauffer business when he was taken ill, and now she feels it is only right to continue it, especially as he left her his Mercedes to do with it what she wants. She starts to feel confident again, loves meeting the clients and enjoys the driving, but also she needs to decide what to do with her marriage – forgive and forget? Come back to Dave? Trust him again?

Now, Roxy. Yes, there were moments that I felt desperate with her, or more likely I felt desperate with her husband, because I really rooted for her and kept everything crossed for her. I think the author has so brilliantly captured her indecisions, uncertainty, being torn between the feeling that she has to stay loyal and putting all others before herself – this is the way we work, we dream of things but we still don’t find the courage to reach for them, and in my opinion Sheila O’Flanagan has done a great job with picturing Roxy like this, making her a living and breathing character. I might have not always agreed with her decisions but I respected them because it’s so easy to say something but much more difficult to do it when you’re not sure what’s good – and Roxy felt so true that all she did or didn’t do simply felt realistic, and her problems and struggles will for sure resonate with many women.
Dave is another story. I wanted to bang his head on the wall every time he tried to get his own way and carry on making Roxy feel as though she’s the one in the wrong, as though everything was her fault, and as he was doing it instantly, this wall would get a nice hollow in it really quickly. It’s one thing when married people are not always able to settle their differences but Dave took it to another level and I hated how he made Roxy feel.

I had a feeling that the pace is rather on the slow side, and I could have lived without some of the passages, and I’ve missed some more action but altogether I enjoyed this novel and I find that it was incredibly easy to read – you know this kind of books when you start to read, five minutes later look at the clock and see that actually it is more than few hours but you simply didn’t notice it, so engrossed you are in the story. “Her Husband’s Mistake” was such a book, I really liked the writing style, it was so natural and easy to follow.

Altogether, it was a down – to – earth, realistic novel about family relationships and dynamics, about second chances and taking things in your hands. I really liked seeing the main character growing in confidence, becoming self – confident, knowing her value and strength. Story that is relatable on many levels, that I really enjoyed and highly recommend.

 

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The House on the Edge of the Cliff by Carol Drinkwater / Blog Tour

The House on the Edge of the Cliff by Carol Drinkwater

 

41trrnx2ctl._sx323_bo1204203200_Publisher: Penguin

Publishing Date: 16th May  2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 448

Genre: General Fiction (Adult)

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

From bestselling author Carol Drinkwater, comes an epic story of enduring love and betrayal, from Paris in the 1960s, to the present day.

No one else knows what happened that summer. Or so she believes . . .

Grace first came to France a lifetime ago. Young and full of dreams of adventure, she met two very different men.

She fell under the spell of one. The other fell under hers.

Until one summer night shattered everything . . .

Now, Grace is living an idyllic life with her husband, sheltered from the world in a magnificent Provençal villa, perched atop a windswept cliff.

Every day she looks out over the sea – the only witness to that fateful night years ago.

Until a stranger arrives at the house. A stranger who knows everything, and won’t leave until he gets what he wants.

The past and present spectacularly collide in this gripping story of love and betrayal echoing across the decades.
_________

my-review

 

Grace fell in love with France almost a lifetime ago, when she was 16 year old girl and came there with her boyfriend Peter. Full of life and dreams then, now living a happy life in the idyllic home on the beautiful coast of Provence with – yes, Peter! However, this idyll is to be shattered with the appearance of a strange man. But is he really so strange? Did Grace used to know him and believed him to have drowned? As the past comes back to haunt Grace, she’s forced to re – examine what has happened all those years ago and at the same time to keep her family safe. Will she manage?

The characters are masterfully written and developed, and while I personally didn’t fell for them all, I nevertheless appreciated them. I must admit that I much more liked them as the adult versions from their younger ones. Grace is our main character and narrator of the story and her voice is distinctive, and there is something confessional in it, she’s not holding back, we get to know the whole truth.

The scenes set in the 1960’s in Paris were very detailed and felt as if they might have been autobiographical perhaps? So many details and so many insider knowledge were there. However, to be totally honest, these scenes were for me very slow going, I much preferred the storyline set in the present, the past simply focused too much and heavily on history and politics and it just didn’t grab me. In the end, I found myself skimming through those parts without a feeling that I’m missing on something. As the story progresses though, it gets darker and more serious, and I had a feeling that something really bad is going to happen.

Carol Drinkwater’s writing style is exquisite and her attention to the smallest details is incredible. The descriptions of nature, food, sea, weather but also feelings and emotions that were milling about on the pages of this book were mesmerizing. The setting of the story, especially the part set in France, is beautiful and I can’t imagine a better one for this book. I loved the idea of the lone house on a cliff, it was a brilliant setting for this story. The house was actually a character of its own, with its history and it changing hands in the family, being a place where everybody feels safe and loved.

There are for sure some twists throughout the story that, in the end, finishes with a satisfying conclusion. Sadly, though, this story didn’t appeal to me as much as I hoped it would – there is no particular reason for this, sometimes it works like this. It was full of dark secrets, misunderstandings and tension, riddled with tragedy. It was a multi – layered story, going back and forth in time. I really, really liked to see how the past has made the characters who they are in the present, to be a witness to all the changes, to watch them changing, making mistakes, growing and maturing. The writing style is descriptive and eloquent, and brings everything the author writes about to life. “The House on the Edge of the Cliff” was a very atmospheric novel about obsession, love, hate, betrayal, guilt and forgiveness.

 

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The Lost Letter of William Woolf by Helen Cullen / Blog Tour

The Lost Letters of William Woolf by Helen Cullen

 

42643850Publisher: Penguin

Publishing Date: 2nd May  2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 416

Genre: General Fiction (Adult)

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Hardcover | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

SHORTLISTED FOR NEWCOMER OF THE YEAR, IRISH BOOK AWARDS

‘If you liked Harold Fry and Me Before You, you will love Cullen’s nostalgic debut. This life-affirming book will draw you in and keep you there’ Independent

‘Delightful’ Sunday Times

‘Deeply moving’ Irish Times

‘I found myself totally transported into William’s poignant and beguiling world of lost opportunities and love’ A. J. Pearce, author of Sunday Times bestseller Dear Mrs Bird

______________

Inside East London’s Dead Letters Depot, William Woolf unites lost mail with its intended recipient. White mice, a miniature grandfather clock and a full suit of armour are among the more unusual items lost then found thanks to William’s detective work.

But when he discovers a series of letters addressed only to ‘My Great Love’, everything changes. Written by Winter to a soulmate she hasn’t yet met, her heartfelt words stir William in ways he has long forgotten. Could they be destined for him? But what about his troubled marriage?

William must follow the clues in Winter’s letters to solve the mystery of his own heart.

Rating: four-stars

 

Let’s start with telling you that I loved the idea of the book – there is hope for letters that went missing or with unclear destination if they find their way to East London’s Dead Letters Depot, where thirty letter detectives work hard, trying to put together whatever clues they can find to reunite the letters with their recipients. William Woolf is one of those detectives. Since 1979, after inheriting the position from his uncle, he’s been working in the depot and he is the right man at the right place. He has his own way of choosing the letters, and one day he finds a midnight blue envelope addressed to “My Great Love”. He’s intrigued. The letters are written by a woman to a man she has never met but feels he’s her soul mate and she hopes to meet him one day. William is fascinated and starts to think they are meant for him, and so he sets his mind on finding this woman. Only he doesn’t take into consideration that his marriage to Claire already is like walking on thin ice. After a great beginning, it looks like they are both living separate lives.

The characters were really well drawn and full of personality. They were full of flaws actually, and gradually and slowly we are made aware of the problems that lie between them. William and Claire simply stopped to communicate and the result is that their marriage became stale and unhappy. William actually felt better among his letters – this is my personal feeling, and while his compassion, dedication and interest were directed towards the letters, his own marriage, real life is suffering. He was more of a loner, and a dreamer in my opinion, feeling much more comfortable with his letters than in his real life.
William was really passionate about his job, and this passion has started already when he was a young boy, filling his notebook with stories from the letters, and some of those stories became a kind of obsession to him, I think we can say this. He doesn’t see them as normal letters but he sees the story behind them, he sees people that send them and who are waiting to receive them. His personal favourites were the one categorized as Supernatural Division, it means letters addressed to God, mythic and mystics.

There were some gorgeous stories contained in those lost letters. They were funny, they were personal, they were heart – breaking and heart – melting. Some were hilarious, some were poignant but they were for sure the strongest part of the book. The book also told us about William and Clare’s relationship, about their highs and lows but I must admit that I had a feeling that these are the letters that are the real main storyline. They were stories of love, grief, loss and hope, beautifully capturing human nature and relationships, feelings and emotions.

It was a story about love that went wrong, about hope, lost communication, disappointment, second chances and a great deal more. It was rather a sad read, realistic and poignant. I had a feeling that the ending is a bit too rushed, especially compared to the rest of the book that was rather moderate in pace, and to be totally honest, I’m still not sure how I feel about it. The author shows great insight into all areas that she writes about, let it be the letters, the stories, the relationships, exploring ups and downs, highs and lows of life and reality. The writing style is lyrical and eloquent but still easy to follow. Altogether, I enjoyed “The Lost Letters of William Woolf”, it was a read with a difference and I hope to read more from the author soon.

 

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The Evidence Against You by Gillian McAllister

The Evidence Against You by Gillian McAllister

 

39940912Publisher: Penguin

Publishing Date: 18th April  2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 422

Genre: Mystery, Crime, Thriller

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

DON’T MISS THE BRAND-NEW THRILLER FROM THE BESTSELLING AUTHOR OF EVERYTHING BUT THE TRUTH AND ANYTHING YOU DO SAY

It’s the day her father will be released from jail. Izzy English has every reason to feel conflicted – he’s the man who gave her a childhood filled with happy memories. But he has also just served seventeen years for the murder of her mother.

Now, Izzy’s father sends her a letter. He wants to talk, to defend himself against each piece of evidence from his trial. But should she give him the benefit of the doubt? Or is her father guilty as charged, and luring her into a trap?

People can’t get enough of Gillian McAllister’s psychological thrillers . . .

 

 

my-review

 

Izzy’s father was found guilty of her mother’s murder and sentenced. Fast forward 18 years and he’s being released now and of course gets in touch with his daughter to profess his innocence. Izzy doesn’t know what to think – he was sentenced, so he was found guilty but he’s also her father that he misses terribly, a father who gave her a childhood filled with plenty of happy, unforgettable moments – but he also murdered her mother! Part of her believes him, so she decides to give him a chance and together they try to uncover the truth – what has really happened and is Gabe as innocent as he says?

I think that after hearing brilliant things about Gillian McAllister, I was simply expecting a book that will blow me away, however “The Evidence Against You” left me with mixed feelings. I, of course, appreciated how deceitful the story was. Throughout the book, along the way, Izzy starts to dig deeper and deeper and finds out that things are much more complicated that they seemed at first, that her mother has kept secrets and lied, but well, the dead can’t defend themselves, right, so it was really confusing for her to decide who to trust, her late mother or her father, and I wouldn’t like to put myself in her shoes to be honest.

I couldn’t engage with the characters in a way that I like to. I was not sure what to think about them, what to make of them. Izzy seemed so emotionless, detached, she lived day after day but she didn’t enjoy her life, she used to keep secrets all the time and from everybody, for no reasons really and she didn’t feel very well rounded. But in the end I was really glad to see that she eventually found the courage to come out of her shell, to do this what makes her happy, to see her relaxed and happy with her life again.

The book grows on you in time though, and even though the characters may not be your favourite ones, I was immersed in the events and the clever plot. I was intrigued to see if Gabe was telling the truth, because of course the author has cared for it not to be too straightforward, she gave us plenty of options and situations to make up our minds, though I found myself changing my own all the time. I simply wasn’t sure who I can trust, and there was a moment or two that I also started to doubt in Izzy herself, gah. As for Gabe again, I had a feeling that he tries to manipulate and really, till the end I found I can’t relax around him.

I really liked how the author gave us the possibility to look at different evidence and see how it works for the different involved sides and people – that was a very clever move from her! It was thrilling to see how one word, one sentence, can change your mind or point you in totally different direction, make you think and sometimes over think. However, there came a moment that it started to feel a little too repetitive, when Izzy was starting to believe in her father innocence and then discovering something that made her – again! – withdrew from contact with him, and then the same pattern repeating itself. Perhaps this is why I found the story progressing very slowly and sometimes I had a feeling that we’re simply not moving ahead.

Nevertheless, the final reveal surprised me, though I am still not my sure what my feelings about it are. On one hand, the author has brilliantly tangled up all the threads, skilfully hidden all the tips that were there for those with eagle eyes (sadly, not me then) but on the other I felt, I don’t know, lukewarm? Disappointed? Also, there was too less tension for me, I just didn’t feel there was any big mystery to be solved, that there was something really bad going to happen. But on the whole I loved how the author has written the story, with the reader (me) being torn between wanting Gabe to be innocent and then believing he most certainly isn’t. It was dark and thought – provoking and I am looking forward to read Gillian McAllister’s previous books.

 

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No Way Out by Cara Hunter / Blog Tour

No Way Out by Cara Hunter

 

39805700Publisher: Penguin

Publishing Date: 18th April  2019

Series: DI Adam Fowley #3

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 360

Genre: Mystery, Crime, Thriller

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

DID YOU SEE ANYTHING ON THE NIGHT THE ESMOND FAMILY WERE MURDERED?

From the author of CLOSE TO HOME and IN THE DARK comes the third pulse-pounding DI Fawley crime thriller.

It’s one of the most disturbing cases DI Fawley has ever worked.

The Christmas holidays, and two children have just been pulled from the wreckage of their burning home in North Oxford. The toddler is dead, and his brother is soon fighting for his life.

Why were they left in the house alone? Where is their mother, and why is their father not answering his phone?

Then new evidence is discovered, and DI Fawley’s worst nightmare comes true.

Because this fire wasn’t an accident.

It was murder.

Rating: four-stars

 

Michael and Samantha Esmond and their two children live in a large house in an expensive part of Oxford. On New Year the fire brigade is called to their property and when they arrive, it’s already engulfed by flames. Two children are being found, three year old Zachary and his older brother Matty. However, there is no sign of the parents, it looks like the children were left alone at home. What’s worse is the fact that all the evidence points to the fire having been started deliberately, of it being an arson. The police and fire investigating team start to investigate.

This, what at the beginning looked like a simple case, turned out into something full of twists, turns, red herrings and puzzles along the way. The story is told “before” and “after”, so we slowly start to find out what has happened on the day of the fire. The events from few months before intertwine with the current police investigation and what emerges is a picture of the family that isn’t necessary happy, as we get to know their dynamics. Actually, it was like peeling away the layers, with each layer revealing more and more, until we get direct into the heart of the event.

No Way Out” is the third book in the DI Adam Fowley series and the first one read by yours truly – no idea how I’ve missed on it, to be honest, though I’m sure that the two previous novels hide somewhere in my never – ending TBR pile – and I had some reservations before reading it, not knowing if it can be read as a stand – alone. Well, the verdict is, yes it can. I haven’t got a feeling that I’m lost, that I’m missing something, the cameos were enough. Though yes, at the beginning I felt really confused with all those DIs, DSs, who was who before and was there someone degraded?

It took me some time to get used to the way it was narrated, as it was told in the first person present and third person past, and at the beginning I wasn’t sure who it is that’s talking to me, but then I simply got used to it, got into the story, felt invested in the characters’ lives so I also didn’t have any more problems. I truly liked the way the author mixed police statements and telephone transcripts, news and social media – it felt so realistic, dynamic and sharp.

This was a captivating, heart – breaking and also sad read, and the relaxed banter from Adam’s team, that occasionally was there to relieve the tension only shows how skilful the author is in planning her novel. It was, for me at least, full of twists, turns and surprises, but I would never make a good investigator, so there, and of course I couldn’t guess the outcome, but this is only a huge bonus point for the book. It dealt with a truly poignant case, and I really appreciated the way the author tackled all those issues – always when children are involved it needs this special, gentle touch and Cara Hunter provided us with it. The author’s writing style is refreshing and very modern, which makes the reading this bit faster. I can only highly recommend this domestic – noir police procedural.

 

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