Him by Clare Empson / Blog Tour

Him by Clare Empson

 

36155709Publisher: Orion

Publishing Date: 4th April 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 352

Genre: Mystery & Thrillers

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

Big Little Lies meets 13 Reasons Why in this dark and suspenseful debut from a stunning new talent.

It all started with … HIM.

Catherine has become mute. She has witnessed something so disturbing that she simply can’t speak – not to her husband, her children, or her friends. The doctors say the only way forward is to look into her past. Catherine needs to start with Him. Lucian.

Catherine met the love of her life at university and was drawn into his elite circle of privileged, hedonistic friends. But one night it all falls apart and she leaves him, shattering his life forever.

Still, fifteen years later, Lucian haunts every one of Catherine’s quiet moments, and when they are unexpectedly reunited, their love reignites with explosive force.

But they can’t move on from what happened all those years ago. In fact, uncovering the truth will cause their lives to implode once again. This time, with disastrous consequences.

my-review

 

15 years ago, Catherine met Lucian and they fell in love – beautiful, honest, passionate love. But then something happens Catherine breaks up with Lucian – without an explanation – and she disappears from his life. But, even though she marries Sam and they have two children, she can’t forget Lucian. Fast forward to present, four months ago something horrible happened to Catherine, something that caused her to shut down entirely, to stop talking with Sam and the children. What happened when she met Lucian again?

The story jumps between past and present. 15 years ago Catherine and Lucian were at the university, then we have 4 months before (before this something really bad happened?). Catherine is in a hospital now, not being able to speak after “this” happened, and the author has done a great job of getting into Catherine’s head, bringing all her fears, feelings and emotions to life. The switches in time may sound confusing but they’re really not, I was always able to keep track of the plot. However, it is a story that develops in a very slow way, so be prepared for this, and I think it wins from not adding many incredibly twists and turns but focusing on the complex, assured plot.

Catherine, Lucian, Liv and Sam were likeable and relatable characters while Lucian’s group of friends was simply awful and, let’s be honest, a little stereotyped, those posh kids at Bristol University, snobbish and privileged. This mix of different personalities was, though, really great but I’d love more depth to them all. However, with them all so different, it was only a matter of time before this all was going to explode, right? For their secrets to be revealed and I’ve been waiting impatiently for this to happen.

I’ve missed Jack’s point of view, his motivation – why was he like this, what was it that made him want to be like Lucian. There was too little depth to his character and I simply couldn’t get his obsession. Also, the fact that there was a mystery, a secret was absolutely brilliant, however in my opinion it took too long to reveal it. From the very beginning we are made aware that something really bad had happened, it is mentioned in almost every single chapter, especially those told from Catherine’s point of view, and you know how it is, sometimes less is more, sometimes it’s advisable not to hint so much and let the reader wait till the very end because they can start to feel frustrated and the whole good idea simply loses on tension and suspense.

“Him” was a story of unconditional love, guilt and obsession. It was a dark and tragic tale of love that’s gone wrong and toxic friendship. It’s a slow burner and is rather character driven but it’s gripping. It felt very mature in terms of literary and it’s a splendid debut novel written with sensitivity and skill. It’s more social drama than psychological thriller for me, but whatever the label it was a gripping, absorbing and heart – wrenching story, very atmospheric, sad and thick with nostalgia.

 

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Our Life in a Day by Jamie Fewery

Our Life in a Day by Jamie Fewery

 

41878858Publisher: Orion

Publishing Date: 18th April 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 304

Genre: General Fiction (Adult), Women’s Fiction

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

Our Life in a Day is a breathtaking, ten-year love story told in twenty-four individual hours – for fans of One Day by David Nicholls, The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky, and The Note by Zoe Folbigg.

The rules are simple. Choose the most significant moments from your relationship – one for each hour in the day.
You’d probably pick when you first met, right?
And the instant you knew for sure it was love?
Maybe even the time you watched the sunrise after your first night together?

But what about the car journey on the holiday where everything started to go wrong?
Or your first proper fight?

Or that time you lied about where you’d been?

It’s a once in a lifetime chance to learn the truth. But if you had to be completely honest with the one you love, would you still play?

For Esme and Tom, the game is about to begin. And once they start, there’s no going back . . .

Rating: three-stars

 

On their 10th anniversary, Esme has created a game for Tom – for each hour of the day he should choose a significant moment from their relationship, so altogether there should be 24 of them, no matter if they’re happy or sad – but they must be important. So Tom, albeit reluctantly, goes back as far as 2007 where they met at the party and together with him we see the best and worst part of their relationship.
The moments Tom has chosen are not listed in a particular chronological order, and maybe it’s better, because there was this surprise effect. It was truly interesting and intriguing to follow those moments, wondering why Tom chose them and not different ones.

The book started great, it had me hooked and hold my interest, but then it somehow went downhill and I really wasn’t sure where it was heading. In the end I found myself skipping some passages without a feeling that I’m missing on something – maybe it was simply too sad and too depressing for me? I know this is life the author wrote about but on the whole the story felt too disheartening, without hope.

My biggest problem here was Esme, I think. I simply couldn’t warm to her and couldn’t accept her demanding attitude. It looked like she was deciding about everything, as if Tom had nothing to say. Everything was good as long as it was Esme’s decision. Sure, Tom also wasn’t perfect, they were both full of flaws, which is great, because who isn’t, but Esme was one of a kind, came across as spoiled and egoistical. Esme doesn’t suggest, Esme demands, and in comparison Tom seems very weak. And while this book was very character driven, and I couldn’t connect with the characters, I had problems with warming to the whole plot, to engage with the story. However, I appreciate the way the author has described and developed his characters. Esme and Tom had their own distinctive voices, their own strengths and weaknesses. There were many moments that I wanted to shake them badly, at Esme being so stubborn and at Tom for keeping the truth from her. But I didn’t feel invested in their lives.

What I liked in this book was that it felt so very realistic and down to earth in the way Tom and Esme’s relationship was working. Sometimes it was good, sometimes it was tense, just like in real life. The writing style was really good – it was easy to read, flowing seamlessly, with vivid descriptions, bringing feelings and emotions to life. It was a story pulling the good and the bad from real life. It provided us with a realistic, brutally honest, bittersweet view of a relationship. It is not a light read, and I think I expected it to be, but I’d say the opposite, as it deals with heavy subjects. It felt raw, real and genuine, without sugar-coating things, telling how it is.

 

The Flatshare by Beth O’Leary

The Flatshare by Beth O’Leary

 

44017619Publisher: Quercus

Publishing Date: 18th April 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 400

Genre: General Fiction (Adult), Romance

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Hardcover | Paperback (out on 05.03.2020)

 

Synopsis:

Tiffy Moore and Leon Twomey each have a problem and need a quick fix.

Tiffy’s been dumped by her cheating boyfriend and urgently needs a new flat. But earning minimum wage at a quirky publishing house means that her choices are limited in London.

Leon, a palliative care nurse, is more concerned with other people’s welfare than his own. Along with working night shifts looking after the terminally ill, his sole focus is on raising money to fight his brother’s unfair imprisonment.

Leon has a flat that he only uses 9 to 5. Tiffy works 9 to 5 and needs a place to sleep. The solution to their problems? To share a bed of course…

As Leon and Tiffy’s unusual arrangement becomes a reality, they start to connect through Post-It notes left for each other around the flat.

Can true love blossom even in the unlikeliest of situations?
Can true love blossom even if you never see one another?
Or does true love blossom when you are least expecting it?

Rating: five-stars

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I really wasn’t sure how it’s possible that “Tiffy and Leon share a bed. Tiffy and Leon have never met” but it turned out that yes, it is possible. They are flatmates – with a twist. Leon needs some money to pay the solicitor, Tiffy needs a flat after her final break – up with Justin. Leon is in the flat only during the day, as he works night shifts at the hospice. Tiffy is in the flat during the evening and night, as she works in publishing as an assistant book editor. So they start to share a one bedroom flat and they never have to meet! That’s it! They start to leave post – it notes for each other about bin days, leftover food etc, but slowly those notes evolve into something deeper and more intimate. They start to have a connection. And then they meet…

You know it, when you had a feeling that you’ve simply clicked with the book, right? Well, I clicked with “The Flatshare”. This was an epic, beautiful, romantic love story that had this “something” that makes a novel absolutely outstanding for you. I started reading “The Flatshare” actually not knowing what to expect but hoping that it’s going to be something particularly beautiful, and I was hooked right from the beginning.

The characters in this book were immediately likeable and believable, and not only the main characters but the group surrounding Tiffy and also Leon’s family who added so much depth and perspective to this story. I loved Tiffy from the word go. She’s quirky, she’s smart and has brilliant one – liners, and simply feels human, especially as she has to overcome her personal obstacles. She’s trying to move on from her recent relationship and slowly comes to realise, how abusive it was, and the word gaslighting comes to mind here. I have kept everything crossed for Tiffy, I wished her all the best in the world and it was a real, real joy to see her growing in confidence in some matters.
And Leon as well. He’s a bit withdrawn, on the quiet side but he has so many valuable qualities. He’s currently campaigning for the appeal of his – presumably – wrongly convicted younger brother who is now in prison. And he’s also trying to track down the long – lost love of one of his patients in hospice. At the beginning I had some problems with the chapters told from Leon’s point of view, they were specifically written, but quickly I got used to his voice and was actually happy that he had this distinctive tone.

The idea with the post – its was ingenious. For the first few months of living together Tiffy and Leon communicate via notes left around the flat. They start with the dates of the bin days and leftover food but over time they start to pick up on each other’s moods through the little cues they leave around the flat: the half – drunk cups of tea or coffee, the unwashed dish, and slowly the correspondence gathers depth and intimacy. I loved how they open up to each other in their post – it notes, how honest they are and how attentive they are, paying attention to the smallest details.

The pacing was perfect, all the time there was something happening. The build up for the characters to meet was brilliant. It took its time but it was so necessary in my opinion, and it was so enthralling, this waiting for them to actually meet in person. I was completely invested in Tiffy and Leon’s lives. Beth O’Leary’s writing style is so, so vivid, chatty and charismatic.
The book was full of so incredibly funny moments, guys, they had me chuckling to myself, and as I am currently struggling a bit with my mental health it isn’t so obvious that something funny will make me smile. Well, this book did it, so already for this it deserves a standing ovation from me. But it is also very emotional – but not too wishy – washy – and it works perfectly well with all those humorous moments, scenes and witty dialogues. And the author handles the heavier issues with a lot of understanding and gentleness.
“The Flatshare” was an uplifting, charming and comforting novel. Actually, it has everything I have expected from it and much more and I can’t believe that it’s the author’s debut. It has a brilliant, likeable and believable characters, wonderful storyline that feels so fresh and unique. I loved it totally and I can’t recommend it to you highly enough!

 

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My Husband’s Wives by Faith Hogan / Blog Tour

My Husband’s Wives by Faith Hogan

 

45013776Publisher: Aria

Publishing Date: 7th March 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 352

Genre: General Fiction (Adult), Women’s Fiction

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

Better to have loved and lost, than never loved.

Paul Starr, Irelands leading cardiologist dies in a car crash with a pregnant young women by his side.

United in their grief and the love of one man, four women are thrown together in an attempt to come to terms with life after Paul. They soon realise they never really knew him at all.

The love they shared for Paul in his life and which incensed a feeling of mistrust and dislike for each other, in his death turns into the very thing that bonds them and their children to each other forever.

As they begin to form unlikely friendships, Paul’s deaths proves to be the catalyst that enables them to become the people they always wanted to be.

Rating: four-stars

Evie, Grace and Annalise’s lives are suddenly brought together after Paul Starr’s death – it turns out they were all married to him. As for Kasia, nobody actually knows what ties her to Paul. The present becomes intermingled with the past as the women say their goodbyes to Paul, and what starts as a complicated mess of secrets, lies and mistrust ends with an unlikely friendship.

With so many main characters there were a few storylines running through the novel and I liked how seamlessly their tales were waived together – it felt natural and authentic, so hats off to the authors for doing it like this. Each of the female characters was different and I really liked to get to know them and their background, and they were really well developed, strong and believable women. I might not have always agreed with their choices and decisions, they were full of flaws but still they were likeable and authentic. Some of them more, some of them less, some of them it was easier to like to hate. I think that Kasia’s character was the most interesting one, her storyline for sure seemed so – it was a subplot with a difference, showing another side to the story. Also, she was kind and warm, always looking for good things in people. Annalise was the most shallow one, I think, a little like bimbo who couldn’t do anything for herself and alone, always unhappy and whinge-y, but as the story progresses you could see the change in her. Evie wasn’t happy with her life, she was vulnerable and I think she was still mourning the end of her relationship with Paul, didn’t come to terms with the break, this vulnerability and fragility were really well described. Grace is a famous artist who also must move on without Paul’s support. They were all compelling, real and authentic and simply they made the book so special.
I couldn’t help but feel dislike to Paul, the smooth operator who always knew what to say, how to make a woman feel wanted, who sweet – talked them, wrapping them around his finger but in the end he was cheating and playing them. He kept so many secrets from them and his lies have caused so much heartache. And I also think that the women were really better off without him – at least they knew where they stand.

I enjoyed the way the book was written. You can’t help but have tons of question and you want to know the answers immediately, but the author really takes her time, drip feeding us with them throughout the story. Maybe this is why I had a feeling that it’s rather slow – paced but it didn’t bother me so much, as there was enough to keep me interested. The fact of Paul having had more than one wife was not the main point of the book in my opinion, but rather the mentioned in the blurb “unlikely friendship”. It was heart – warming and beautiful to see how the women became friends. They were suddenly connected, in truly difficult circumstances, and yet they found strength, which the author vividly captured.

“My Husband’s Wives” was a story full of secrets and intrigues, filled with sadness, friendship and family bonds. It was about finding friendship and confidence, a touching story about grief and how it affects people. And the author had a way with words, she can beautifully write about feelings and emotions and gave her characters very distinctive voices and beautifully balance the lighter and darker sides of life. Recommended!

 

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Stone Mothers by Erin Kelly

Stone Mothers by Erin Kelly

 

42427478Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton

Publishing Date: 4th April 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 352

Genre: Mystery & Thrillers, Psychological Suspense

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Hardcover | Paperback (out on 19.03.2020)

 

Synopsis:

Erin Kelly, master of suspense, returns with her next thrilling standalone featuring an abandoned mental asylum and the secrets it holds.

Marianne was never supposed to return to town, the town where she grew up in the shadow of the Nazareth Mental Hospital. Her mother may be suffering from dementia nearby, but she had thought she’d left that place, and its dark secrets, behind her. That is, until her husband buys a flat in its newly renovated interior so that she can be close enough to help her mother, and Marianne can’t tell him why the place fills her with such dread, she can’t risk destroying the careful life she’s built. Erin Kelly, the master of suspense, will delight fans with her next thrilling novel of psychological suspense.

Rating: four-stars

“Stone Mother” was used as a term for an asylum. Such a mental hospital was the heart of a small town of Nusstead in Suffolk, that is, until it was closed, leaving many of the town residents unemployed. Now apartments have been built where the hospital used to be and Marianne’s husband Sam surprised her, buying one of them. Marianne is spooked and agitated but the reasons for her feelings are different to those you could think about… There is her ex – boyfriend Jesse involved, there is an old scandal and a successful but loathed politician. What do they all have to do with Marianne? And why is she so scared of living in the so – called “Park Royal Manor”?

This was a complex story told through different timelines. Rather of a slower pace, especially the first part, and to be honest I had some difficulties to get into it, which made me start to panic actually, and I think that mostly it was because there were so many detailed descriptions of the Nazareth hospital – there was more hospital than the actual story. And, well, I couldn’t connect with Marianne – no particular reason, she just felt too meh, too spineless, and Jesse made me feel desperate. However, when the story changed the narrator, it also speeded up and then there was nothing that could drag me away from the book and I was drawn into the characters’ lives.

The story is split into four parts and each part is told from a different point of view. This was not a bad idea, though it was also a bit risky – in my opinion, of course – because Marianne and her long, long story was the first one to be told. As I’ve just mentioned, I had problems with this character, with some of her decisions and I was getting frustrated and scared by the end of part one – scared that I’ll have to give up. For me, the real rollercoaster started with Helen and her story. Helen was probably the most interesting and compelling character in this book for me, she had something to tell, something to hide, the way she was was absolutely intriguing – she has saved the book for me.

Erin Kelly has brilliantly captured the atmosphere of the abandoned hospital. Creepy and dark, it gave me chills, and not only when it was abandoned, oh no, but especially when there were still patients and this setting of the mental hospital worked really well as a backdrop to the characters.
I’ve only read “He Said/She Said” by this author before and it blew my mind to be honest, so I was expecting something like this book again, and it took me by surprise as “Stone Mothers” was totally different. It doesn’t mean that it’s bad, of course. What is the same though is the brilliant writing style, so chilling, intense and intelligent, and the way Erin Kelly creates her characters and writes a character – driven drama.There were turns, twists and events that made my heart stop for a beat, guys. Not many of them but when they came, they were so well crafted, they were absolutely unexpected and unsettling.

This novel has a complex, complicated storyline and it took its time to eventually untangle all the secrets and Erin Kelly is a very skilful writer, with her beautiful prose and the way with words. “Stone Mothers” touched upon many issues, mental health being only one of them. There were lies that tied the characters together, secrets and blackmail, coming of age, poverty and revenge. It was also about women and concern about their mental health, their freedom and their choices. In the end, I’ve learnt to appreciate the long haul and the mystery was very well written, the way it evolved was complex and captivating. It was powerful and it was touching and I really enjoyed it. Recommended!

 

Sleep by C.L. Taylor / Blog Tour

Sleep by C.L. Taylor

 

40584479Publisher: Avon

Publishing Date: 4th April 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 368

Genre: Mystery & Thrillers, General Fiction (Adult)

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Hardcover  | Paperback (out on 05.09.2019)

 

Synopsis:

All Anna wants is to be able to sleep. But crushing insomnia, terrifying night terrors and memories of that terrible night are making it impossible. If only she didn’t feel so guilty…

To escape her past, Anna takes a job at a hotel on the remote Scottish island of Rum, but when seven guests join her, what started as a retreat from the world turns into a deadly nightmare.

Each of the guests have a secret but one of them is lying – about who they are and why they’re on the island. There’s a murderer staying in the Bay View hotel. And they’ve set their sights on Anna.

Seven strangers. Seven secrets. One deadly lie.

Someone’s going to sleep and never wake up…

Rating: four-stars

 

After a car accident, which claimed lives of Anna’s two colleagues and severly injured another one, she decides for a complete change in her life and takes up a position of a receptionist and general dogsbody in a small hotel on the Scottish Island of Rum, hoping to get rid of the guilt she has after being a driver of the car. She needs a time out and sleep and overcome the night terrors that keep plaguing her, and what better place to start if not on a remote island with only 36 residents? Soon after she starts working there, seven guests arrive at the hotel and strange things and events occur, making Anna think if her stalker followed her from London to Scotland? Is she in danger? Is someone trying to… kill her?

I like the fact that the twists and turns in this novel were so straight to the point. I can’t give you an example (obviously!) but I simply loved how the things happened and without all the extras, there wasn’t any unnecessary building the tension, will it happen/won’t it happen/what ifs, it was such a pleasant change and made the reading so much more dynamic and thrilling.

The book started in a perfect and very promising way: “If you’re reading this then I am no longer alive” – wow, right? The remoteness of the hotel has added so much to the storyline, it was a great idea to set it on the Scottish Island of Rum, cut off from the world because of raging storms. This really sets the scene, dark, mysterious and dangerous and the feeling of isolation, of being cut off from the outside world – literally – was there, and was overwhelming.

The characters were very well written and vividly described. They were troubled and full of flaws and they kept secrets, and what was great was the fact that actually I was all the time changing my mind about them – I always like this feeling of uncertainty, of not knowing who I can trust. They were not likeable to be honest, and in fact, personally, I didn’t really care who’s the culprit, because they were all able to do this and because well, I didn’t have my own favourites. They simply didn’t quite hit the mark for me.

But guys, I’m not sure what it was but I’ve missed something in this book. Maybe I’ve simply expected much more? C.L. Taylor is an author that’s getting raving reviews and I keep hearing brilliant things about her books so probably I went into “Sleep” expecting unimaginable things. Don’t get me wrong, it was a good book, interesting and hooking but also somehow flat for me, not reaching the promising height it could have. Yes, I was intrigued but I’ve missed the tension, this overwhelming feeling that something bad is going to happen. And Anna seemed to me very cold, lacking in emotions and while I was worried about her, I didn’t feel any connection to her, a connection that would make me vibrate, that would make me sit on my tenterhooks, shout “watch out” and completely fell for her.

“Sleep” was a story full of twists and turns. I had, however, a feeling that the author didn’t engage with the characters, that she was not fully in their skin – I’ve missed the connection there, or maybe it was intentional? Never mind, it didn’t work for me too well. But I still enjoyed the storyline, the surprises that the author has thrown our way, and the fact that actually till the very last moment I was kept guessing. It was a solid and interesting psychological thriller with addictive writing style – the prose, the assortment of words has me reading every sentence, every word, as I simply didn’t want to miss anything. The clues and red herrings were placed masterfully, in all the right places yet it really took me till the end to find out who was the one trying to kill Anna and why – because the why is also not so obvious. Recommended!

 

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The Missing Sister by Dinah Jefferies / Blog Tour

The Missing Sister by Dinah Jefferies

 

40949889Publisher: Penguin

Publishing Date: 21st March 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 320

Genre: Historical Fiction

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

A stolen sister. A daughter determined to uncover the truth.

Belle Hatton has embarked upon an exciting new life far from home: a glamorous job as a nightclub singer in 1930s Burma, with a host of sophisticated new friends and admirers. But Belle is haunted by a mystery from the past – a 25 year old newspaper clipping found in her parents’ belongings after their death, saying that the Hattons were leaving Rangoon after the disappearance of their baby daughter, Elvira.

Belle is desperate to find out what happened to the sister she never knew she had – but when she starts asking questions, she is confronted with unsettling rumours, malicious gossip, and outright threats. Oliver, an attractive, easy-going American journalist, promises to help her, but an anonymous note tells her not to trust those closest to her. . .

Belle survives riots, intruders, and bomb attacks – but nothing will stop her in her mission to uncover the truth. Can she trust her growing feelings for Oliver? Is her sister really dead? And could there be a chance Belle might find her?

Rating: four-stars

 

In “The Missing Sister” we are taken on a journey to Burma in 1936. Annabelle Hatton, known as Belle, travels to Rangoon to start her new job as a night club singer there. But there is also more to this trip – in one of her late father’s books she has discovered some old newspaper clippings about a three – weeks – old baby vanishing in 1911 from one of the gardens in Burma. It turns out it was Elvira, Belle’s older sister. She’s determined to discover what has happened to the baby. She finds help and encouragement in Oliver, a young journalist but can she really trust him? Little notes are posted under her door by a stranger, warning her off – is she in danger? And who wants to discourage her to looking after Elvira?

I love Dinah Jeffries books and the unpredictability of them. I never know where she’s going to take us, to which exotic nook of the world. I love her characters – strong, young women, usually well ahead of their times, quirky and bold. And I love how well researched her books are, and that she has such a keen eye for details. I know what I can expect from her novels and I always get it, and it was the same with “The Missing Sister”.
The chapters told from Diane, Belle’s mother, point of view, added so much to this story. We were slowly able to get to know the truth, to learn what has happened – and they were perfectly timed with Belle’s adventures. Diane’s grief after losing her baby was heart – breaking, actually seeing what was happening to her was heart – breaking, for so long she’s been blamed for the disappearance of her baby which resulted in her mental health turning down, and it was great to see her rising like a phoenix from the ashes eventually. But of course Belle’s time spent in Burma was exceptionally interesting – the author has made sure that she wasn’t sure whom to trust – the characters were really well developed, full of flaws and secrets and they were not afraid to harm others to keep their secrets secrets.

It was a very atmospheric story full of puzzles and mysteries. There were lies and secrets, corruptions, the overwhelming feeling of danger and this all blended with the gorgeous and fascinating descriptions of Burma that were colourful, vibrant, exotic and vivid and the author brings the setting and the strong characters easily to life and those things felt authentic. The writing was eloquent and elegant, seamlessly interweaving interesting plot and stunning location, mixing mystery and romance. “The Missing Sister” was a hooking, captivating read with a difference – highly recommended!

 

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