The Little Bakery on Rosemary Lane by Ellen Berry

The Little Bakery on Rosemary Lane by Ellen Berry

 

33939393Publisher: Avon

Publishing Date: 7th September 2017

Series: Rosemary Lane #2 (read my review of Book 1 here)

Source:  Received from the publisher in return for an honest review, thank you!

Number of pages: 368

Genre:  Women’s Fiction, General Fiction (Adult)

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

If you want to move forward, sometimes you have to go back …
Prepare to fall in love with beautiful village of Burley Bridge.

Growing up in a quiet Yorkshire village, Roxanne couldn’t wait to escape and find her place in the world in London. As a high-powered fashion editor she lives a glamorous life of perennial singlehood – or so it seems to her sister Della. But when Roxanne gets her heart broken by a fashion photographer, she runs away, back to Della’s welcoming home above her bookshop in Burley Bridge.

But Burley Bridge, Roxanne discovers, is even quieter than she remembered. There’s nothing to do, so Roxanne agrees to walk Della’s dog Stanley. It’s on these walks that Roxanne makes a startling discovery: the people who live in Burley Bridge are, well, just people – different from the fashion set she’s used to, but kind and even interesting. Michael, a widower trying to make a go of a small bakery, particularly so. Little by little, cupcake by cupcake, Roxanne and Michael fall into a comforting friendship.

Could there be a life for Roxanne after all, in the place she’s spent 46 years trying to escape?

Rating: three-stars

 

“The Little Bakery on Rosemary Lane” is the second book in the Rosemary Lane by Ellen Berry series but it can easily be read as a stand – alone. The book mentions some of the characters from the previous novel but it entirely focuses on a new character, Roxanne. She has left Yorkshire as a teenager, and now she’s in her late forties and loves her work as a fashion editor. She’s passionate about her job, and she’s also successful, she has great ideas and she knows what it is the readers of the magazine want to see. However, there are some changes to come in the magazine and it’s a little unsettling – as well as her relationship she’s in starts to shake the foundations. So Roxanne decides to go back to Yorkshire where her sister Della still lives – Della, the one who owns the cookbook shop from the previous book.

This story started so, so well! I was doing the virtual high – fives because it was feeling like reading the good, old Fiona Gibson again – the writing was so warm and engaging, the story was flowing and I was incredibly caught up in the story. However, the more I got into the book, the slower and flatter it felt. There was not much happening and I had a feeling it is very repetitive and in the end I found myself skipping some of the passages and even a chapter or two – I am very sorry for this but it just didn’t keep my attention. Then there is the same thing as with the first book in the series, “The Bookshop on Rosemary Lane” – the bookshop is in the title, as is the bakery in this book, but they are not the huge part of the story, the bakery hardly features in this story and it’s just misleading.

I did like Roxanne. She was a great leading character. She was very passionate about her job, you could really feel she loves what she does and that she feels comfortable in her own skin. She was creative, and I always love this in characters. However, she finds herself at the crossroads right now, what with big changes at work and some troubles in love paradise, and we accompany her on her journey to find out what she really wants.
I really liked how Roxanne started to see that she really likes the countryside and that there is much more to living there as she thought, even though she sometimes learn to like it in the hard way, like going for a walk with the dog totally unprepared and dressed in very unsuitable clothes. It was nice to see her changing, making new friends, helping at the shop and feeling well in her own skin.

The London part of the book was really good, fast – paced and I totally enjoyed it. However, the Yorkshire part, while really important, as it was the time that Roxanne – of course! – started to change and see what she wants, was for me a little too flat, too slow, too meh. It was a tad predictable and some things, such like the later changes at Roxanne’s magazine, felt much too rushed and much too clichéd and obvious.

Altogether, “The Little Bakery on the Rosemary Lane” was a warm, lovely story. It felt modern and up – to – date and it lovely mixed the world of fashion with cookbooks and fresh, tasty bread. It was about making your own choices, about not letting others to influence you, seeing you can really take the risk. It was an easy, pleasant read with a low – key romance and even though I maybe didn’t love it as much as I initially thought, it was still pleasant enough and I am looking forward the third book in the series.

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The Law of Attraction by Roxie Cooper / #BlogTour + #Giveaway

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The Law of Attraction by Roxie Cooper

 

34927591Publisher: HQ Digital

Publishing Date: 23rd June 2017

Source:  Received from the publisher via NetGalley in return for an honest review!

Number of pages: 384

Genre:  Romance,  Women’s Fiction

 Buy the Book: Kindle

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

“Well, it’s fair to say your background isn’t conventional in terms of the average barrister…” Dolus points out. “Well that depends on your definition of conventional and who wants to be average anyway?”

Northern girl Amanda Bentley isn’t your average lawyer.

She spent her teenage years in the Working Men’s club and hanging out in the park to avoid going home. Fresh out of law school she lands pupillage at a top set of Chambers and is catapulted into a world completely alien to her own, fighting prejudice and snobbery at every turn.

Piling on the pressure, this year it is announced two candidates have been accepted but there’s only one job at the end of it. And her competition? Marty, her smarmy law school nemesis.

Throw into the mix an ill-advised romance with the staggeringly sexy Sid Ryder and Amanda quickly realises winning pupillage isn’t just about how good a lawyer you are.

But even if she does come out on top, all of it could be for nothing if her colleagues ever discover who she really is and one very dark secret.

Rating: three-stars

I don’t know much about barristers, so I really liked all the descriptions in “The Law of Attraction” by Roxie Cooper, a fresh and already distinguished voice in the women’s literature, starting with the interview, the pupillage and accompanying our main character Amanda on her way to become a real barrister. It was great to get an insight into all the “traditions”, the dinners, the initiations – those were the most hilarious parts of the story probably.

But you know, I don’t know about this book. Sure, yes, I got the message but on the other hand I am not sure why did Amanda tried so hard to prove she can be a barrister with a long and blonde hair. I mean, I have long blonde hair myself and I really never felt such a need to prove that I can do something. I don’t know, I can’t put my finger on what it was, but this story just didn’t feel so real for me and too predictable. It just didn’t wow me as much as I think it’s going to, judging on so many other raving reviews. So probably the problem might be me. For sure it was not a story about a “girl powers”, as Amanda wasn’t afraid to go to wars with her female colleagues from work – yes, I did spotted they were all bitches from hell, no worries, and it’s a pity that there was not one single girl being sympathetic to Amanda. Oh no, sorry. I forgot Heidi.

There were plenty of characters and while mostly they were really well portrayed, there was a thing that bothered me, and it was the fact that they were so very much stereotyped. The “bad” guy was odious, laughable and everything came to him so easily because of his rich father. Of course then Amanda was a witness to all of his shenanigans. I don’t mean I liked him or something, oh god, no, Marty was very annoying but also not to believable. The main character was the poor, smart as hell girl from the wrong class, proving that yes she can and pulling out of her old life. However, as much as she herself hated those that were stereotyping, I had a feeling that this is what she does all the time, starting with looking at herself through a prism of stereotype. What now, Amanda? All the characters, they were all made so that from the beginning we either like them and keep our fingers for them or dislike them.

The romance aspect… was there. For my liking also too predictable, and I thought Amanda is a little more cautious, especially knowing what’s at stake, but no, she trusted him so easily. I really wasn’t sure what I think about this whole affair, is it appropriate? And if not, then actually why not?

What I really liked were the parts that focused on Amanda at work. She did really feel like a kid in a candy store in the courtroom and she had a great passion for her job. Also, as the story progressed, we got to know more about Amanda’s past, about her childhood and probably it was created for us to understand Amanda better, her and her life choices. It was nice she got a conclusion and eventually learnt that the past can’t bring her down. But let’s be honest, when she revealed what has really happened in her past, well… it left me lukewarm, it didn’t feel worth the fuss – my opinion only. However, Amanda was this kind of character that learnt from her own mistakes. She didn’t stay in one place but she grew as a person. So I think it’s a thing that we should really appreciate, that she was like a real person who more often followed her heart than her head when making decisions as it only made her feel like a real, breathing person. And even though all of my reservations, I still admired her determination and I truly wanted her to succeed in everything she set her eyes on.

Altogether, it was a little different story about following your dream and not letting other people to patronize you and your choices, showing that hard work wins at the end. It touched upon the struggle that women still need to face in some environments. It was light and funny, if a tad predictable, but still I think there was so much potential to the writing and I would love to see more from Roxie Cooper – she can for sure create feisty, quirky heroines that have a lot to show to the world.

GIVEAWAY:

It’s UK only.

Prise: a copy of the book, a legally blonde DVD and a £10 MAC gift card

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31 Days of Wonder by Tom Winter

31 Days of Wonder by Tom Winter

 

35108104Publisher: Corsair

Publishing Date: 10th August 2017

Source:  Received from the publisher via NetGalley in return for an honest review!

Number of pages: 314

Genre:  General Fiction (Adult), Humour

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Hardcover

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

‘And in that instant, he knows in his heart that today is a momentous day; come what may, he and Alice will meet again, and life will never be the same.’

Alice is stuck in an internship she loathes and a body she is forever trying to change.

Ben, also in his early twenties, is still trying to find his place in the world.

By chance they meet one day in a London park.

Day 1
Ben spots Alice sitting on a bench and feels compelled to speak to her. To his surprise, their connection is instant. But before numbers are exchanged, Alice is whisked off by her demanding boss.

20 minutes later
Alone in her office toilets, Alice looks at herself in the mirror and desperately searches for the beauty Ben could see in her.

Meanwhile, having misunderstood a parting remark, Ben is already planning a trip to Glasgow where he believes Alice lives, not realising that they actually live barely ten miles apart.

Over the next 31 days, Alice and Ben will discover that even if they never manage to find each other again, they have sparked a change in each other that will last a lifetime. In 31 Days of Wonder, Tom Winter shows us the magic of chance encounters and how one brief moment on a Thursday afternoon can change the rest of your life.

Rating: three-stars

“31 Days of Wonder” by Tom Winter is a well – written, quirky and modern story that took me by surprise. There are comedic moments, as well as many poignant ones and it introduces us to quirky, different characters. It turned out to be a very different kind of book to this what I read – not your usual romance or mystery – but there was still a lot of heart in the descriptions and writing.

As I am used to books that describe the lives’ of characters that eventually get together, of their paths criss – cross, I was a little confused when I eventually got to learn that it’s not going to be the case here – and it’s not a spoiler because we can read it in the synopsis already, and somehow I’ve missed this part. But whatever.
Nevertheless, I just couldn’t get into the book. This issue that I’ve just mentioned above when the characters don’t come together was one of my problems – please do not sue me but for me the characters’ paths must cross during the story because if it doesn’t happen then why write about them in one book? Yes, of course, I DID get the message of this book, that a chance meeting may change your life for better and for ever, but for me it just didn’t wow me. I can’t help it.
But of course there were things that I did like in this story. It is told during 31 days, one chapter for one day, and a story about normal people with issues, written in the third person and two alternating points of view. Ben has health problems that are not that apparent at first – and to be honest, only mentioning that he needs his pills etc didn’t help to get into the story, I’d love to know from the beginning what it was that he had, maybe it would help me to understand him better. Alice has weight issues and really, I don’t know who the people around her were as they didn’t have any problems to tell her that yes, she’s fat. Even her own mother. It didn’t make me to warm to this part of the story as well, even though Alice was likeable and relatable kind of girl. Both those characters learn lots about themselves during their 31 – days – long journey, and we together with them.

The characters and the situations are very down – to – earth and they are believable. They both find themselves in works that feel dull and unnecessary, they have friends that are more or less supportive, they both share a flat with other people, have difficult relationships with their closes ones and it should be relatable for me but it just felt flat and whiney – I am truly sorry that I felt like this because I had great hopes for this story. Yes, it was a different read and I finished it, and I enjoyed it but there was this “something” missing, this something that makes the read exceptional.

“31 Days of Wonder” is a story about changes and seeing good things in yourselves, about taking control of your own life and earning respect for yourself. It shows you that in fact you don’t need a lot, that sometimes one smile from a stranger can change everything and how important it is to find the thing that makes us happy. Even though it was not my favourite read, I still appreciated the way the plot went, and how much depth and heart there was in the writing style and storytelling.

The Wardrobe Mistress by Natalie Meg Evans / #BlogTour

Hi guys, and happy Friday! Yesterday I came back from my (well deserved, even if I say so myself) holidays and today I am already back to blogging with my stop on Matalie Meg Evans’s blog tour. I love good historical fiction and this author is really at the top of my favourite authors list, and really, I can only recommend her novels! Here is my review of her newest release, “The Wardrobe Mistress”.

The Wardrobe Mistress by Natalie Meg Evans

 

35652772Publisher: Quercus

Publishing Date: 10th August 2017

Source:  Received from the publisher in return for an honest review!

Number of pages: 448

Genre:   Historical Fiction, Literature/Fiction (Adult)

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Paperback

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

From the award-winning author of The Dress Thief comes a love story set in the glittering world of London theatre. Perfect for fans of Lucinda Riley and Kathleen Tessaro.

War has been over more than a year but rationing and shortages persist. The worst winter in two-hundred years is just around the corner. London desperately needs an injection of cheer and colour, and the glamorous Farren Theatre Company intends to provide it.

Young war widow, Vanessa Kingcourt, has just been hired as wardrobe mistress at the notorious old theatre the Farren in London. Working backstage at the Farren is a lifelong ambition, and she’s looking to re-find the sense of purpose that war work gave her. But when Vanessa becomes romantically entangled with the Farren’s married owner – the enigmatic Alistair Redenhall – Vanessa’s career, and her very happiness, are put on the line.

Rating: three-stars

Natalie Meg Evans is on the top list of my favourite historical fiction authors, so I was incredibly excited to see she’s about to publish her fourth novel, “The Wardrobe Mistress”. The book went with me on my holidays and I was incredibly excited to start reading it – I adored Ms Evans’s books in the past, and this one was also sounding very promising.

The author sticks with her favourite historical period as the story takes us to the post – war London. The book consists of four parts and follows the story of Vanessa Kingcourt. It also ventures to a world of theatre, and as I love stories about theatres, I truly had high expectations here. So Vanessa – she was a wireless operator during the war, and now she wants to reconnect with her family, and especially her father who has left the family on his daughter’s sixth birthday. But life, as usual, has other ideas and there is no reconnection to be. However, there is the other meeting, with a captain Alastair Redenhall, that takes Vanessa on a very different, adventurous journey. Alastair has inherited a theatre from his godfather, and he truly never has expected such inheritance – well, he was a captain, and taking on a theatre was a totally new role for him.

But oh boy. This book gave me a headache. There was a mystery, but it was tangled in many other events and characters and it just felt very slow and I sometimes had a feeling that very little is happening and it took my whole willpower to continue reading – fortunately, as then, later on, the pace gained some tempo. There were twists and turns that I would never have expected to come but somehow, and it annoys me very, very much as I can’t put my finger on why, I just couldn’t connect with the story and it didn’t wow me as much as I hoped it would. I also couldn’t warm to the characters – maybe because there were so many of them, and really, I had a feeling that the plot jumps between them and situations and I just couldn’t find myself captured, just couldn’t get into the depth of the book. The characters felt too one – dimensional to me and I think that Fern was one of the most outstanding in this novel – she was clever and even though she was playing games, those were intelligent games. Alistair was blowing hot and cold and yes, I get it, he was a sea man thrown suddenly and unexpectedly into totally different entourage and eventually, in the end, I started to warm to him. Vanessa was a great leading character and here I had no problems to like her from the very beginning. She had a mind of her own and, as it usually happens, she was way ahead of her times in the way she was thinking. She has never gave up, and I really appreciated her for this. But altogether, for me, I couldn’t start to trust them completely, there was something holding me back, and I was asking myself if their motivations are honest.

As I have already mentioned, there were some twists and turns in this story, but it was all happening so very slowly, to finally come to a dramatic end. But somehow all the good things just happened too late and couldn’t save the book for me. However, the author, as always, has perfectly chosen the setting and the descriptions of the theatre, of how the costumes, the plays were prepared, were brilliant, full of details and very, very vivid.

Altogether, I am very sad to say that “The Wardrobe Mistress” was not my favourite read by Natalie Meg Evans, I think that her previous books are better, faster and more captivating, however I am not saying that this novel is bad! Oh no, it has its moments, and the writing style is beautiful, full of vividness and I am sure that it’s going to steal pieces of the author’s fans’ hearts. I am already looking forward to Ms Evans next book.

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Our Summer Together by Fanny Blake

Our Summer Together by Fanny Blake

 

35235801Publisher: Orion

Publishing Date: 13th July 2017

Source:  Received from the publisher in return for an honest review!

Number of pages: 320

Genre:  Literature/Fiction (Adult),  Women’s Fiction

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Paperback

 

 

 

Synopsis:

OUR SUMMER TOGETHER is an uplifting story about family, friendship and the happy surprise of finding love later in life.

Caro knows how to be a mother – advising her grown-up daughters on career and relationship worries. She knows how to be a grandmother – enjoying the hectic energy of her three-year-old grandson. She knows how to be a daughter – helping her aging mother retain her independence.

She thought she knew everything about being a wife, but when her husband suddenly leaves her for another woman, everything is thrown in the air. So, when a chance meeting introduces her to Damir – younger, intriguing and attentive – she realises that opening up to a man so different from everyone else in her life, might also mean getting to know who she really is…

Rating: three-stars

“Our Summer Together” is Fanny Blake’s next emotional, subtle and believable romance that I’ve been longing to read. This author is known to write compelling, atmospheric and very down – to – earth novels that are full of love and hope and when this newest release has arrived, I started to read it immediately.

What I find really great is that more and more authors start to write stories about mature heroines, women who have lived and experienced a lot and truly have something to tell. And Caro is one of such heroines. The story picks up shortly after the sixty – years – old Caro and her husband had a divorce, after he left her for a younger woman, but to be honest, from what I’ve read I’ve deduced that it’s better like this, that her husband undermined her. However – of course – Caro’s life needs adjusting right now. But then she surprisingly meets a stranger on a train – Damir, who has his own story as well, but it is a very different kind of story, and Fanny Blake has done an excellent job with his character. He’s not too sugary, he’s not too wishy – washy, even if his background is a very particular one. He’s the man who knows how it is to loose everything: family, home, country.

Caro was also portrayed in a great, very down – to – earth and realistic way. She was trying very hard to be there for her two daughters, at the same time trying to come to terms with her new single life. It was truly adorable to see how she was starting to blossom again, to see there is much more to life and to proverbially grow up, and I think she was a character that was very easy to relate to and to sympathise with. Well, at least my sympathy was on her side, she has deserved to enjoy life after divorce.

However, I am sure I’d have enjoyed this book much better if I haven’t had the feeling that I’ve read such story a few times already. It was too clichéd, with the ex – husband finding new love and having a new family, with the daughters using their mother without a thank you and then not supporting her, the whole family finding it difficult to accept that she may have a life that doesn’t include them, and with the here and there with the romance. It was – in my opinion of course – this kind of book that needed one or two really great twists, to make the readers gasp, and I missed this in this novel.

“Our Summer Together” is a story that has some layers to it, even though there are not many life – changing situations and sudden twists and turns. It is written in a very peaceful, relaxing and easy to follow way, with just the right number of characters, and characters that were believable and likeable. A story about self – realisation, self – discovery, showing us that it’s never too late to let your dreams come true. Perfect read for one balmy evening with a glass of chilled wine.

Broken Branches by M. Jonathan Lee

Broken Branches by M. Jonathan Lee

35106198Publisher: Hideaway Fall

Publishing Date: 27th July 2017

Source:  Received from the publisher in return for an honest review!

Number of pages: 294

Genre:  Literature/Fiction (Adult), Psychological, Mystery

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Paperback

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

‘Family curses don’t exist. Sure, some families seem to suffer more pain than others, but a curse? An actual curse? I don’t think so.’

A family tragedy was the catalyst for Ian Perkins to return to the isolated cottage with his wife and young son. But now they are back, it seems yet more grief might befall the family.

There is still time to act, but that means Ian must face the uncomfortable truth about his past. And in doing so, he must uncover the truth behind the supposed family curse.

Rating: three-stars

Hideaway Fall are the new kids on the publishing block and guys, they are starting really, really well – the campaign for “Broken Branches” by M. Jonathan Lee, their first book, is more than brilliant, and the way they take care of the book bloggers is so, so lovely. I was very intrigued by the synopsis to “Broken Branches”, however the book turned out to be totally different to what I was thinking it’s going to be, which – of course – sometimes happens, but it also doesn’t mean that it made me feel disappointed. Because not, it didn’t. It was actually so that I wasn’t sure what to expect, yet the book was different to what I was expecting – weird, I know.

So, now. This book. There was a creepy, grim atmosphere to this story that was brilliantly captured by the author. It was dark, it was foreboding and there was such a ghostly feeling to it. There were two timelines, past and present of Ian, the main character, and the author has really did the jumping between the times very well. However, the whole story was more than confusing to me, to be absolutely honest, and I couldn’t connect with the characters. The more we got into the story, the more manic Ian was becoming in his lust to uncover the truth, he was like a man possessed and I really didn’t know what to think – if there really is something, or if we’re dealing with a mentally ill character. I still have some questions about Ian, his research seemed to lead down a blind alley.

Altogether, it was a different but very atmospheric read and I really liked the writing style, that was powerful, very rich and yet forthcoming and easy, and some of the atmospheric description could give you the creeps. It was not my usual read, and maybe I just don’t appreciate it enough, and I’m really sorry for that, but it just didn’t work for me as much as I think it would. It is set at a very slow pace and while this may help you to get a real sense of what’s happening, for me personally it was too slow, and somehow I just couldn’t get into the whole idea of the curse and this Gothic element to this story, and the supernaturals just didn’t sit with me. This slow pace has made me feel a little restless, I started to skip some passages and well, this waiting till the very end for the big revelation was too much for me. I probably just didn’t “get” the story, for which I apologise – just please take into consideration I am sharing my thoughts and feelings. I did enjoy some aspects but I also found myself struggling with it, hence my 3* rating. However, if you are a fan of supernatural and curses, be sure to try this book for yourself!

The Little Kiosk by the Sea by Jennifer Bohnet / #BlogTour

Hi guys! I am starting into the new week with another blog tour, ta – dah! This one is celebrating the publication of Jennifer Bohnet’s “The Little Kiosk by the Sea” – a sweet, little book with a feel – good factor and many different characters.

The Little Kiosk by the Sea by Jennifer Bohnet

35400544Publisher: HQ

Publishing Date: 15th June 2017

Source:  Received from the publisher in return for an honest review!

Number of pages: 288

Genre:  Women’s Fiction

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Paperback

 

 

 

Synopsis:

Time’s running out to save the little kiosk by the sea…

Sabine knows that if she doesn’t come up with a plan to save her little kiosk soon, it might be too late. If only her best friend Owen would stop distracting her with marriage proposals!

Harriet is returning to Dartmouth for the first time in thirty years, haunted by the scandal that drove her away and shocked by an inheritance that could change everything.

Rachel never expected to find love again after her world was shattered a year ago. But it seems as if the sleepy seaside town has different ideas…

One thing’s for sure, it’s a summer they will never forget!

Rating: three-stars

This gorgeous cover was one of the things that made me attracted to “The Little Kiosk by the Sea”- it is so colourful and just beautiful, I love this blue, and it just screams summertime, don’t you think? After reading the synopsis I was hoping it’s going to be a story that will whisk me away to a warm, sunny place – did it?

Well, yes and no.

The characters were introduced to us as if they were not introduced, if you follow me. Their presence was just thrown at us, and having in mind there were six main characters it was, well, challenging. It felt as if the introduction of new characters will never stop but it did stop, of course, and what was great is the fact that I’ve never felt confused with who is who and why. At first there didn’t seem any connection between them, it felt so weird to have them all, popping out just out of the blue. There was not much depth to them, they were very straight – forward. It doesn’t mean they weren’t likeable, because they were, but I just couldn’t warm to them because I didn’t know what’s their role in this story should be. Each chapter was told from the different character’s point of view and yes, sometimes I had a feeling I am reading many different stories but eventually those stories started to interlink – however, the bringing of extra characters only to solve one of the subplots is not my favourite way. I just wanted more depth to the characters and the whole story and it would be brilliant!
There was nothing that would discompose the characters – no matter how shocking or surprising the news were, they just stayed cool as a cucumber – it was as if they didn’t have any feelings or emotions. I mean, so easily accept you have a nine – old – months baby that you have to take care of right at this moment? Discover that your aunt was a best – selling author, leaving your daughter almost one million pounds without batting an eye? It just felt weird, so very automatic and robotic, as if they really weren’t real people. The huge life changes were accepted just like this and it was all running so smoothly, nobody questioned anything and it just felt a little too unrealistic – but maybe sometimes it’s not bad when there is not so much drama, right? And it was actually nice to see how the characters rubbed along together, how they simply worked, and mostly they all wore their heart on the sleeves.
Time was passing between the chapters very quickly and without knowing it two or so months have been gone by. It just felt weird. There were so many subplots in this story that I had a feeling none of it is really deeply developed.

But altogether, it was a lovely, nice read that perhaps is not going to stay with me for a long time but it was good enough for me to spend some relaxing hours. The setting was beautiful, and the author truly vividly brought it to life. “The Little Kiosk by the Sea” was a lovely story about huge life changes, new opportunities and family relationships. And even with all those reservations I did enjoy this story. There was a lot of feelings in it, passion and hidden secrets, and this all written in a very easy, forthcoming writing style.

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