Stone Mothers by Erin Kelly

Stone Mothers by Erin Kelly

 

42427478Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton

Publishing Date: 4th April 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 352

Genre: Mystery & Thrillers, Psychological Suspense

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Hardcover | Paperback (out on 19.03.2020)

 

Synopsis:

Erin Kelly, master of suspense, returns with her next thrilling standalone featuring an abandoned mental asylum and the secrets it holds.

Marianne was never supposed to return to town, the town where she grew up in the shadow of the Nazareth Mental Hospital. Her mother may be suffering from dementia nearby, but she had thought she’d left that place, and its dark secrets, behind her. That is, until her husband buys a flat in its newly renovated interior so that she can be close enough to help her mother, and Marianne can’t tell him why the place fills her with such dread, she can’t risk destroying the careful life she’s built. Erin Kelly, the master of suspense, will delight fans with her next thrilling novel of psychological suspense.

Rating: four-stars

“Stone Mother” was used as a term for an asylum. Such a mental hospital was the heart of a small town of Nusstead in Suffolk, that is, until it was closed, leaving many of the town residents unemployed. Now apartments have been built where the hospital used to be and Marianne’s husband Sam surprised her, buying one of them. Marianne is spooked and agitated but the reasons for her feelings are different to those you could think about… There is her ex – boyfriend Jesse involved, there is an old scandal and a successful but loathed politician. What do they all have to do with Marianne? And why is she so scared of living in the so – called “Park Royal Manor”?

This was a complex story told through different timelines. Rather of a slower pace, especially the first part, and to be honest I had some difficulties to get into it, which made me start to panic actually, and I think that mostly it was because there were so many detailed descriptions of the Nazareth hospital – there was more hospital than the actual story. And, well, I couldn’t connect with Marianne – no particular reason, she just felt too meh, too spineless, and Jesse made me feel desperate. However, when the story changed the narrator, it also speeded up and then there was nothing that could drag me away from the book and I was drawn into the characters’ lives.

The story is split into four parts and each part is told from a different point of view. This was not a bad idea, though it was also a bit risky – in my opinion, of course – because Marianne and her long, long story was the first one to be told. As I’ve just mentioned, I had problems with this character, with some of her decisions and I was getting frustrated and scared by the end of part one – scared that I’ll have to give up. For me, the real rollercoaster started with Helen and her story. Helen was probably the most interesting and compelling character in this book for me, she had something to tell, something to hide, the way she was was absolutely intriguing – she has saved the book for me.

Erin Kelly has brilliantly captured the atmosphere of the abandoned hospital. Creepy and dark, it gave me chills, and not only when it was abandoned, oh no, but especially when there were still patients and this setting of the mental hospital worked really well as a backdrop to the characters.
I’ve only read “He Said/She Said” by this author before and it blew my mind to be honest, so I was expecting something like this book again, and it took me by surprise as “Stone Mothers” was totally different. It doesn’t mean that it’s bad, of course. What is the same though is the brilliant writing style, so chilling, intense and intelligent, and the way Erin Kelly creates her characters and writes a character – driven drama.There were turns, twists and events that made my heart stop for a beat, guys. Not many of them but when they came, they were so well crafted, they were absolutely unexpected and unsettling.

This novel has a complex, complicated storyline and it took its time to eventually untangle all the secrets and Erin Kelly is a very skilful writer, with her beautiful prose and the way with words. “Stone Mothers” touched upon many issues, mental health being only one of them. There were lies that tied the characters together, secrets and blackmail, coming of age, poverty and revenge. It was also about women and concern about their mental health, their freedom and their choices. In the end, I’ve learnt to appreciate the long haul and the mystery was very well written, the way it evolved was complex and captivating. It was powerful and it was touching and I really enjoyed it. Recommended!

 

Advertisements

The Passengers by John Marrs

The Passengers by John Marrs

 

40718386Publisher: Del Ray

Publishing Date: 1st April 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher via NetGalley, thank you!

Number of pages: 400

Genre: Mystery & Thrillers, General Fiction (Adult)

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Paperback (out on 30.05.2019)

 

Synopsis:

Eight self-drive cars set on a collision course. Who lives, who dies? You decide.

When someone hacks into the systems of eight self-drive cars, their passengers are set on a fatal collision course.

The passengers are: a TV star, a pregnant young woman, a disabled war hero, an abused wife fleeing her husband, an illegal immigrant, a husband and wife – and parents of two – who are travelling in separate vehicles and a suicidal man. Now the public have to judge who should survive but are the passengers all that they first seem?

Rating: three-stars

 

“The Passengers” takes us to a world with self – driving cars… You don’t have to do anything, you are a passenger that simply sits in the car. Traffic congestion, pollution and accidents has gone down significantly. The cars are, of course, unhackable… That is, until one day, the system IS hacked. Eight “passengers” are on their way to different locations when suddenly they’re told their cars are taken over and soon they’re going to die in an accident. The governing body that oversees the driverless cars and the whole of AI technology are contacted and they, as well as some of the normal people serving in a jury, are to choose who of the 8 people should be saved and why. It is all, of course, streamed to social media and the general public also gets involved. The race against time begins – is it possible to save those people?

There was a great cast of characters. Among the passengers we have a refugee woman, an Indian woman with a family that was abused by her husband and who doesn’t speak English, a wife and husband of ten years, both in two different cars, a pregnant woman, a famous actress, an army veteran and a young man who’s down on his luck. Each of them is trapped, their routes being taken over, their destination programmed. After two and a half hours one of them will live, while the rest will die. A group of jury members, who are actually investigating who’s at fault when there is a car accident and people die (and it’s almost never the car’s fault!), are dragged into the hacker’s game. The only jury member who makes a stand against the hacker and the other members is Libby, a mental health nurse with a great dislike of the driverless cars.

It was a great story about manipulation and the dangers of technology. It was horrifying to see how easily you can manipulate people, showing them this what you want them to see, and actually how people react, where their morals lie, how easy it is to led them. I was very involved in the characters’ lives though I didn’t allowed myself to judge them, waiting for the outcome. And the fact that the author actually didn’t care which of the character should die, not falling onto pieces over them, was a great and refreshing change. He also brilliantly captured the mob mentality on social media and on the streets.

But. And there is a “but”, sadly. For me the book has a great premise, it started brilliantly and the development was also great, though I must admit that there were already moments that it seemed to me that the author had a great idea but then wasn’t sure how to direct it furthermore, how to bite it to make it thrilling. And then came the end that was a disappointment for me. I was expecting a mind – blowing, fireworks ending but it simply felt flat and not complete, not wrapped up. It seemed as if the idea petered away, and I’m really sad about this as I was hoping for so much more from John Marrs. Don’t get me wrong, please, I was hooked to the pages, I vibrated together with the characters, I wanted to punch some of them in their faces and kept everything crossed for the others, and then it was as if the balloon has deflated. Sadly.

But altogether, it was a fast – paced and full of twists and turns story and although it touched upon some difficult and thought – provoking issues, it was an easy read, surprising you with the development of the story. The author has brilliantly captured the future world – he made it scary and dangerous and it really freaked me out to see that people not only allow the electronic devices decide for them but they’re also not afraid to play with other people’s lives. It was accomplished and unsettling and I am so truly sorry and also sad that it didn’t work for me – I wanted to love this book but I also wanted more substance and better execution. However, I know there is so much potential in John Marrs’ writing, his books are original and unique and I’ll be reading whatever he writes in the future.

 

Sleep by C.L. Taylor / Blog Tour

Sleep by C.L. Taylor

 

40584479Publisher: Avon

Publishing Date: 4th April 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 368

Genre: Mystery & Thrillers, General Fiction (Adult)

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Hardcover  | Paperback (out on 05.09.2019)

 

Synopsis:

All Anna wants is to be able to sleep. But crushing insomnia, terrifying night terrors and memories of that terrible night are making it impossible. If only she didn’t feel so guilty…

To escape her past, Anna takes a job at a hotel on the remote Scottish island of Rum, but when seven guests join her, what started as a retreat from the world turns into a deadly nightmare.

Each of the guests have a secret but one of them is lying – about who they are and why they’re on the island. There’s a murderer staying in the Bay View hotel. And they’ve set their sights on Anna.

Seven strangers. Seven secrets. One deadly lie.

Someone’s going to sleep and never wake up…

Rating: four-stars

 

After a car accident, which claimed lives of Anna’s two colleagues and severly injured another one, she decides for a complete change in her life and takes up a position of a receptionist and general dogsbody in a small hotel on the Scottish Island of Rum, hoping to get rid of the guilt she has after being a driver of the car. She needs a time out and sleep and overcome the night terrors that keep plaguing her, and what better place to start if not on a remote island with only 36 residents? Soon after she starts working there, seven guests arrive at the hotel and strange things and events occur, making Anna think if her stalker followed her from London to Scotland? Is she in danger? Is someone trying to… kill her?

I like the fact that the twists and turns in this novel were so straight to the point. I can’t give you an example (obviously!) but I simply loved how the things happened and without all the extras, there wasn’t any unnecessary building the tension, will it happen/won’t it happen/what ifs, it was such a pleasant change and made the reading so much more dynamic and thrilling.

The book started in a perfect and very promising way: “If you’re reading this then I am no longer alive” – wow, right? The remoteness of the hotel has added so much to the storyline, it was a great idea to set it on the Scottish Island of Rum, cut off from the world because of raging storms. This really sets the scene, dark, mysterious and dangerous and the feeling of isolation, of being cut off from the outside world – literally – was there, and was overwhelming.

The characters were very well written and vividly described. They were troubled and full of flaws and they kept secrets, and what was great was the fact that actually I was all the time changing my mind about them – I always like this feeling of uncertainty, of not knowing who I can trust. They were not likeable to be honest, and in fact, personally, I didn’t really care who’s the culprit, because they were all able to do this and because well, I didn’t have my own favourites. They simply didn’t quite hit the mark for me.

But guys, I’m not sure what it was but I’ve missed something in this book. Maybe I’ve simply expected much more? C.L. Taylor is an author that’s getting raving reviews and I keep hearing brilliant things about her books so probably I went into “Sleep” expecting unimaginable things. Don’t get me wrong, it was a good book, interesting and hooking but also somehow flat for me, not reaching the promising height it could have. Yes, I was intrigued but I’ve missed the tension, this overwhelming feeling that something bad is going to happen. And Anna seemed to me very cold, lacking in emotions and while I was worried about her, I didn’t feel any connection to her, a connection that would make me vibrate, that would make me sit on my tenterhooks, shout “watch out” and completely fell for her.

“Sleep” was a story full of twists and turns. I had, however, a feeling that the author didn’t engage with the characters, that she was not fully in their skin – I’ve missed the connection there, or maybe it was intentional? Never mind, it didn’t work for me too well. But I still enjoyed the storyline, the surprises that the author has thrown our way, and the fact that actually till the very last moment I was kept guessing. It was a solid and interesting psychological thriller with addictive writing style – the prose, the assortment of words has me reading every sentence, every word, as I simply didn’t want to miss anything. The clues and red herrings were placed masterfully, in all the right places yet it really took me till the end to find out who was the one trying to kill Anna and why – because the why is also not so obvious. Recommended!

 

FOLLOW THE BLOG TOUR:

sleep_blogtourp1

 

Finding Dorothy byElizabeth Letts / Social Media Blast

Finding Dorothy by Elizabeth Letts

 

44072454Publisher: Quercus

Publishing Date: 4th April 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 368

Genre: Historical Fiction, General Fiction (Adult)

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Hardcover | Paperback (out on 20.02.2020)

 

Synopsis:

A richly imagined novel that tells the story behind The Wonderful Wizard of Oz , the book that inspired the iconic film, through the eyes of author L. Frank Baum’s intrepid wife, Maud–from the family’s hardscrabble days in South Dakota to the Hollywood film set where she first meets Judy Garland.

Maud Gage Baum, widow of the author of the book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, met Judy Garland, the young actress playing the role of Dorothy on the set of The Wizard of Oz in 1939. At the time, Maud was seventy-eight and Judy was sixteen. In spite of their age difference, Maud immediately connected to Judy–especially when Maud heard her sing “Over the Rainbow,” a song whose yearning brought to mind the tough years in South Dakota when Maud and her husband struggled to make a living–until Frank Baum’s book became a national sensation.

This wonderfully evocative two-stranded story recreates Maud’s youth as the rebellious daughter of a leading suffragette, and the prairie years of Maud and Frank’s early days when they lived among the people–especially young Dorothy–who would inspire Frank’s masterpiece. Woven into this past story is one set in 1939, describing the high-pressured days on The Wizard of Oz film set where Judy is being badgered by the director, producer, and her ambitious stage mother to lose weight, bind her breasts, and laugh, cry, and act terrified on command. As Maud had promised to protect the original Dorothy back in Aberdeen, she now takes on the job of protecting young Judy.

Rating: four-stars

“Finding Dorothy” is written from Maud Gage Baum’s point of view – she was Frank L. Baum’s, the author of “The Wizard of Oz”, wife. It tells the story in two different time frames and subplots – the first one starting in the 1870’s and telling about Maud’s private life and the second in the 1939 Hollywood, where filming of “The Wizard of Oz” starring Judy Garland took place.
I haven’t seen the film, so there, I’ve just said that. But if I’m to see it anytime then I’ll know that the slippers weren’t ruby and that Oz isn’t emerald green – as the book has just confirmed this.

It was a beautiful, nostalgic story that I thoroughly enjoyed, though I think I’d love to hear about Maud’s childhood much more, she was such a tomboy, just a girl after my own heart. Nevertheless, her story was absolutely captivating, colourful and one of a kind. We cover the years from 1871 to Hollywood in 1939, following a dual time line in Maud’s life.
The story of Maud being a daughter of a leading voice for women’s rights Matilda Gage was already hooking, but it was even better and more interesting to learn Maud getting to know Frank and what has happened after that. Of them, young and poor, and raising a family of four boys. Of Matilda being so upset with her young, independent and well educated daughter to marry so quickly and a “theatre man” that she stopped talking to her daughter after the marriage. I don’t want to recount more – the story is rich in detailed, brilliantly researched information and facts and it’s so hooking that just go and read it for yourself and fell in love with it, just like I did. Maud proves to be her own woman, strong, optimistic and determined.
The second subplot is the making of the movie and Maud tries to keep it true to her husband’s original storyline and where she befriends Judy Garland, and it was fascinating to read those parts. I admired Maud so much, her strength and determination and how unselfish she was, trying to help Judy during filming. She was not afraid to speak her mind when fighting for her husband’s vision, when she’s noticed that something was not right – clearly, the fact of being a daughter of a famous suffragette paid off.

I loved Maud’s passion and determination to ensure that the movie really reflected her late husband’s vision, especially after so many refusals and people and life throwing challenges at her. I adored being able to have a look at the behind the scenes of the movie parts of the story. However, it was also shocking, especially the way the author described how the then 15 years old Judy Garland was treated. I’m guessing that what she’s written has really happened – pills for everything, cigarettes, slap in the face, many “uncles” surrounding her – this manipulation and yes, abuse, was on a daily basis.

It was a very well researched story, with some acts and events of course distorting the truth but still realistic and sounding real. It was an original, captivating, colourful read, full of hidden treasures, behind the scenes facts and things that never saw the light of day. Be aware that the books starts a little slowly and is rather long, as the author goes on to describe the lives of Maud and Frank in a very detailed way, introducing us to all the places where they used to live and all the jobs Frank took up, but when it picks up on pace there was nothing that could me drag away from it. It’s a book with a heart, poignant and touching, a tribute to Frank L. Baum, Maud Baum and “The Wizard of Oz”. It’s about never giving up, about having dreams and letting them come true. The author in a great way blends facts and fiction, so well in fact that you won’t be able to tell which is which. It felt authentic and passionate, engaging and is very well written. Highly recommended!

FOLLOW THE SOCIAL MEDIA BLAST

Finding Dorothy social media blast poster

 

The Missing Sister by Dinah Jefferies / Blog Tour

The Missing Sister by Dinah Jefferies

 

40949889Publisher: Penguin

Publishing Date: 21st March 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 320

Genre: Historical Fiction

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

A stolen sister. A daughter determined to uncover the truth.

Belle Hatton has embarked upon an exciting new life far from home: a glamorous job as a nightclub singer in 1930s Burma, with a host of sophisticated new friends and admirers. But Belle is haunted by a mystery from the past – a 25 year old newspaper clipping found in her parents’ belongings after their death, saying that the Hattons were leaving Rangoon after the disappearance of their baby daughter, Elvira.

Belle is desperate to find out what happened to the sister she never knew she had – but when she starts asking questions, she is confronted with unsettling rumours, malicious gossip, and outright threats. Oliver, an attractive, easy-going American journalist, promises to help her, but an anonymous note tells her not to trust those closest to her. . .

Belle survives riots, intruders, and bomb attacks – but nothing will stop her in her mission to uncover the truth. Can she trust her growing feelings for Oliver? Is her sister really dead? And could there be a chance Belle might find her?

Rating: four-stars

 

In “The Missing Sister” we are taken on a journey to Burma in 1936. Annabelle Hatton, known as Belle, travels to Rangoon to start her new job as a night club singer there. But there is also more to this trip – in one of her late father’s books she has discovered some old newspaper clippings about a three – weeks – old baby vanishing in 1911 from one of the gardens in Burma. It turns out it was Elvira, Belle’s older sister. She’s determined to discover what has happened to the baby. She finds help and encouragement in Oliver, a young journalist but can she really trust him? Little notes are posted under her door by a stranger, warning her off – is she in danger? And who wants to discourage her to looking after Elvira?

I love Dinah Jeffries books and the unpredictability of them. I never know where she’s going to take us, to which exotic nook of the world. I love her characters – strong, young women, usually well ahead of their times, quirky and bold. And I love how well researched her books are, and that she has such a keen eye for details. I know what I can expect from her novels and I always get it, and it was the same with “The Missing Sister”.
The chapters told from Diane, Belle’s mother, point of view, added so much to this story. We were slowly able to get to know the truth, to learn what has happened – and they were perfectly timed with Belle’s adventures. Diane’s grief after losing her baby was heart – breaking, actually seeing what was happening to her was heart – breaking, for so long she’s been blamed for the disappearance of her baby which resulted in her mental health turning down, and it was great to see her rising like a phoenix from the ashes eventually. But of course Belle’s time spent in Burma was exceptionally interesting – the author has made sure that she wasn’t sure whom to trust – the characters were really well developed, full of flaws and secrets and they were not afraid to harm others to keep their secrets secrets.

It was a very atmospheric story full of puzzles and mysteries. There were lies and secrets, corruptions, the overwhelming feeling of danger and this all blended with the gorgeous and fascinating descriptions of Burma that were colourful, vibrant, exotic and vivid and the author brings the setting and the strong characters easily to life and those things felt authentic. The writing was eloquent and elegant, seamlessly interweaving interesting plot and stunning location, mixing mystery and romance. “The Missing Sister” was a hooking, captivating read with a difference – highly recommended!

 

FOLLOW THE BLOG TOUR:

missing2bsister2bblog2btour

 

The Dangerous Kind by Deborah O’Connor

The Dangerous Kind by Deborah O’Connor

 

31930640Publisher: Zaffre

Publishing Date: 11th April 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher via Pigeonhole, thank you!

Number of pages: 448

Genre: Mystery, Crime

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Hardcover (out on 16.05.2019)

 

Synopsis:

What if the people we trust are the ones we should fear? The breakout thriller of 2019 that will make you second-guess everyone you meet.

We all know them. Those who exist just on the fringes of society. Who send prickles up the back of our neck. The charmers. The liars. The manipulators. Those who have the potential to go that one step too far. And then take another step.

Jessamine Gooch makes a living from these people. Each week she broadcasts a radio show looking into the past lives of convicted killers; asking if there was more that could have been done to prevent their terrible crimes.

Then one day she is approached by a woman desperate to find her missing friend, Cassie, fearing her abusive husband may have taken that final deadly step. But as Jessamine delves into the months prior to Cassie’s disappearance she fails to realise there is a dark figure closer to home, one that threatens the safety of her own family . . .

Set over a long, dark winter in London and perfect for fans of HE SAID/SHE SAID, THE DANGEROUS KIND is at once a gripping thriller and a stunning portrayal of the monsters that live among us.

Rating: three-stars

 

Did you know that 1 in 100 people fall into the category of “potentially dangerous”? It means that they’re very likely to commit a crime. Do you know who could this be? Your neighbour? Who, of the people that surround you, might be a potential danger?
“The Dangerous Kind” explores this topic. It starts with an encounter that turns into something dangerous. We then follow the BBC presenter Jessamine, who is asked to look into a disappearance of a young woman, and the story of Rowena, a thirteen – year – old girl, a very dark und unsettling tale of her life.

It was hard for me to get into this book. There were many characters introduced to us and I really wasn’t sure on whom I should focus. The author has also chosen to minusculely and meticulously describe everything – how the characters looked like, what they wore, the colour of the sky and how many leaves there were on the trees, and to be totally honest it was too much for me.

Jessamine was a character that stood out. She was feisty and was not afraid to break the rules to find the truth. She was honest and determined and often wasn’t afraid to put herself in danger. All the other characters were impressively well written, adding tons of tension and making you ask questions. They were all flawed, they made many mistakes, were troubled. Rowena’s story was heart – breaking, literally, reading about her life was incredibly sad and also made me feel so angry – because those things really happen. Jitesh’s narration, however, and I know his character has a purpose in the story, but it was still somehow strange, I wasn’t sure of its purpose and I’d be able to live without this subplot.

I must admit that while some of the subplots and reveals were not surprising for me, there were also some that took me by surprise indeed – I don’t want to tell here which is which as I don’t want to write any spoilers here but let me just tell you that there were moments that the author truly pulled the wool over my eyes. I liked how all the threads eventually start to come together.

As much as it was an important book, touching upon some very, very important and controversial issues, I couldn’t shake off the feeling that I’ve already read many novels like this and not much could surprise me here. Sure, please don’t get me wrong, it was shocking and I gasped more than once when reading it, and it tugged at my heartstrings, and it was sad and brutally realistic but there weren’t many things that I haven’t read before. However, it was a thought – provoking thriller. It could be – you must be aware of this – upsetting for some, as it explores children sexual abuse or domestic violence however with sensitivity and without being too graphic, and thanks god for it. The writing style is assured and I had a feeling that the author really knows what she’s writing about – the research was done brilliantly and you can see that O’Connor cares deeply about the things she writes about, that they’re important to her. Hats off to the author for writing about such hard hitting storyline, about discussing uncomfortable truths. Recommended!

 

No – One Ever Has Sex at a Wedding by Tracy Bloom

No – One Ever Has Sex at a Wedding by Tracy Bloom

 

43465865Publisher: Bookouture

Publishing Date: 29th March 2019

Series: No – One Ever Has Sex #4

Source:  Received from the publisher via NetGalley, thank you!

Number of pages: 260

Genre: General Fiction, Humour

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

In Katy’s opinion, weddings should follow some basic rules:

1) No-one should ever have sex. Of course. The married couple has the rest of their lives for that, and the guests should be too busy partying.

2) If you are heavily pregnant (as Katy is) you should obviously not be invited to three weddings in the space of one summer. Your husband’s accident-prone best friend, your attention-seeking colleague, your 73-year-old mother’s marriage to her Spanish toy boy – all without even an alcoholic drink to make them bearable.

3) During the speeches, it should not be revealed that you had a secret one-night-stand with one of the other guests.

4) Instead of laying bets on the length of the best man’s speech, guests should not be laying bets on whether a marriage will be in ruins before the end of the meal…

But this summer, Katy is lucky enough to be the special guest at the weddings that break ALL of the rules. What could possibly go wrong?

Rating: four-stars

 

Katy is pregnant with her second child and has a problem – there are not only many weddings looming in the future, but Braindead had inadvertently, during his groom speech at his wedding, let the cat out of the bag about the situation that has happened many years ago, and now Alison has kicked Matthew out. So it’s not only that all the friends feel obliged to bring them back together, there is also the joint wedding of Daniel and her own mother. Oh boy.

Dreams comes true, ha? So many of the readers always wanted to read more about Braindead and here we are. “No – One Ever Has Sex at a Wedding” follows the group of our old friends but while the other books were mostly about Katy and Ben, here the author focuses on the other characters as well, and you know what? I really enjoyed it. I’ve got my dose of Katy and Ben but I also satisfied my curiosity when it comes to Matthew, Alison, Braindead, Daniel and co. This time Alison kicks Matthew out and everybody feels obliged to help them see the sense. Each of the characters is involved – Katy because she feels guilty, Ben because he has no other option, Daniel because he loves to be the centre of attention, Ian because he wants to have his flat for himself again, Braindead because he was the reason Alison found out and, as you can expect, chaos arises. But it’s a brilliant chaos, funny and heart-warming, and while it may not be a read that’s going to stay with you for long, it’s a pure entertainment.

This is already a fourth book in the No – One Ever Has Sex and I am not sure if I would advise you to read it as a stand – alone. Simply, you’d miss too much on brilliant reads, but also, even though the most of the key plots from the previous reads are mentioned briefly, I still think that to fully enjoy the story and understand the characters (I’ve noticed some of the reviewers were annoyed with the nickname “Braindead” for example – but those were the ones who haven’t read the previous books before) you should read the books in the right order.

It was a quick, entertaining read that was like a sitcom. There weren’t many detailed descriptions and the events were happening one after another without long and unnecessary introductions, it was more dialogue – orientated and believe me, there were some brilliant conversations throughout the story, the banter was quick, sharp and hilarious. However, guys, this book is not only laugh, there are also some more poignant moments and I liked how the author balanced those moments. Some of the speeches were simply beautiful and unforgettable.
Altogether, “No – One Ever Has Sex at a Wedding” was a funny, undemanding read with a hidden depth, full of shenanigans and embarrassing situations about families, relationships and great friendship, about sticking together through thick and thin. Truly recommended!