A Perfect Cornish Summer by Phillipa Ashley / Blog Tour

A Perfect Cornish Summer by Phillipa Ashley

 

41716141Publisher: Avon

Publishing Date: 25th April  2019

Series: Porthmellow Harbour #1

Source:  Received from the publisher via NetGalley, thank you!

Number of pages: 400

Genre: Women’s Fiction

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Paperback (out on 16.05.2019)

 

Synopsis:

The first in a gorgeous new series from the author of Summer at the Cornish Cafe.
Summer is on the horizon, and the people of Porthmellow are eagerly awaiting the annual food festival. At least, most of them are…
For Sam Lovell, organising the summer festival in her hometown is one of the highlights of her year. It’s not always smooth sailing, but she loves to see Porthmellow’s harbour packed with happy visitors, and being on the committee has provided a much-needed distraction from the drama in her family life (and the distinct lack of it in her love life).
When their star guest pulls out with only a few weeks to go, everyone’s delighted when a London chef who grew up locally steps in at the last minute. But Gabe Matthias is the last person Sam was expecting to see, and his return to Porthmellow will change her quiet coastal life for ever.
Curl up with this gorgeous novel and savour the world of Porthmellow Harbour.

 

my-review

 

Sam Lovell owns a Catering Company and organises the yearly local food festival. This year, however, there is a major incident, as the guest celebrity chef pulls out at the last minute. Sam’s friend Chloe manages to organize a replacement but when Sam learns who it is, she’s not too happy – Gabe Matthias, TV chef, who’s local and has history with Sam, history that she’d rather forget, and there is a serious reason why she feels like this. But not only Sam, also part of the town as well. Will Gabe be able to get them all on side again? Is it at all possible that the food festival make it to another year, and more?

There were plenty of characters in this novel, and every single one of them with their own story, so in the end there are many threads running through the novel. It wasn’t the easiest to keep them all on track and I often felt confused at who, why and what, and where shall I pay attention? But of course those storylines are much relevant and they tie well with one another, and I’m guessing we needed them in this book as a kind of introduction for the next books in the series that will for sure focus on different characters. Nevertheless, I had a feeling that simply too much is going on in this book.

My biggest problem with this novel was the fact that there was actually nothing that has surprised me. All the time I had a feeling “I’ve been there, I’ve seen this” and this is probably why it couldn’t keep my attention. There was all you could wish for in that kind of a book: friendship, community, romance, good food etc, and it’s great, please don’t get me wrong, but it simply felt too flat and too repetitive. And the names Samphire and Zennor, well, at the beginning I’ve though that must have been a spelling error but it turned out they weren’t. I couldn’t get used to them till the very end of the book, to be honest. And why was their brother called Ryan then? In for a penny, in for a pound, right?

As much as the circumstances of bringing Sam and Gabe back together were really nice, I still had a feeling that there is not enough interaction between them, that there is not enough chemistry, and so this relationship left me feeling a bit lukewarm. Also, huge parts of the book are dedicated to the festival, and of course it was absolutely all right, and I enjoyed them, but somehow, Gabe and Sam simply went astray in all those descriptions of the events, all the organizational issues.

Phillipa Ashley’s writing style is lovely, sunny and bright. She must be one of the best when it comes to the settings of her novels, because they are always picturesque, exceptionally beautiful and effortlessly brought to life. She easily transports you to the place she’s writing about. And altogether, !A Perfect Cornish Summer” was a light – hearted, warm story about second chances, community spirit, friendship and family, and it had this brilliant Food Festival in it as well – though I’d love more of it itself than the build up towards it, more lush descriptions of food. An uplifting tale about working together, sticking together and helping one another to succeed.

 

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Sleep by C.L. Taylor / Blog Tour

Sleep by C.L. Taylor

 

40584479Publisher: Avon

Publishing Date: 4th April 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 368

Genre: Mystery & Thrillers, General Fiction (Adult)

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Hardcover  | Paperback (out on 05.09.2019)

 

Synopsis:

All Anna wants is to be able to sleep. But crushing insomnia, terrifying night terrors and memories of that terrible night are making it impossible. If only she didn’t feel so guilty…

To escape her past, Anna takes a job at a hotel on the remote Scottish island of Rum, but when seven guests join her, what started as a retreat from the world turns into a deadly nightmare.

Each of the guests have a secret but one of them is lying – about who they are and why they’re on the island. There’s a murderer staying in the Bay View hotel. And they’ve set their sights on Anna.

Seven strangers. Seven secrets. One deadly lie.

Someone’s going to sleep and never wake up…

Rating: four-stars

 

After a car accident, which claimed lives of Anna’s two colleagues and severly injured another one, she decides for a complete change in her life and takes up a position of a receptionist and general dogsbody in a small hotel on the Scottish Island of Rum, hoping to get rid of the guilt she has after being a driver of the car. She needs a time out and sleep and overcome the night terrors that keep plaguing her, and what better place to start if not on a remote island with only 36 residents? Soon after she starts working there, seven guests arrive at the hotel and strange things and events occur, making Anna think if her stalker followed her from London to Scotland? Is she in danger? Is someone trying to… kill her?

I like the fact that the twists and turns in this novel were so straight to the point. I can’t give you an example (obviously!) but I simply loved how the things happened and without all the extras, there wasn’t any unnecessary building the tension, will it happen/won’t it happen/what ifs, it was such a pleasant change and made the reading so much more dynamic and thrilling.

The book started in a perfect and very promising way: “If you’re reading this then I am no longer alive” – wow, right? The remoteness of the hotel has added so much to the storyline, it was a great idea to set it on the Scottish Island of Rum, cut off from the world because of raging storms. This really sets the scene, dark, mysterious and dangerous and the feeling of isolation, of being cut off from the outside world – literally – was there, and was overwhelming.

The characters were very well written and vividly described. They were troubled and full of flaws and they kept secrets, and what was great was the fact that actually I was all the time changing my mind about them – I always like this feeling of uncertainty, of not knowing who I can trust. They were not likeable to be honest, and in fact, personally, I didn’t really care who’s the culprit, because they were all able to do this and because well, I didn’t have my own favourites. They simply didn’t quite hit the mark for me.

But guys, I’m not sure what it was but I’ve missed something in this book. Maybe I’ve simply expected much more? C.L. Taylor is an author that’s getting raving reviews and I keep hearing brilliant things about her books so probably I went into “Sleep” expecting unimaginable things. Don’t get me wrong, it was a good book, interesting and hooking but also somehow flat for me, not reaching the promising height it could have. Yes, I was intrigued but I’ve missed the tension, this overwhelming feeling that something bad is going to happen. And Anna seemed to me very cold, lacking in emotions and while I was worried about her, I didn’t feel any connection to her, a connection that would make me vibrate, that would make me sit on my tenterhooks, shout “watch out” and completely fell for her.

“Sleep” was a story full of twists and turns. I had, however, a feeling that the author didn’t engage with the characters, that she was not fully in their skin – I’ve missed the connection there, or maybe it was intentional? Never mind, it didn’t work for me too well. But I still enjoyed the storyline, the surprises that the author has thrown our way, and the fact that actually till the very last moment I was kept guessing. It was a solid and interesting psychological thriller with addictive writing style – the prose, the assortment of words has me reading every sentence, every word, as I simply didn’t want to miss anything. The clues and red herrings were placed masterfully, in all the right places yet it really took me till the end to find out who was the one trying to kill Anna and why – because the why is also not so obvious. Recommended!

 

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The Mum Who Got Her Life Back by Fiona Gibson / Blog Tour

The Mum Who Got Her Life Back by Fiona Gibson

 

41841567Publisher: Avon

Publishing Date: 7th March 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 400

Genre: General Fiction (Adult), Women’s Fiction

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

The laugh-out-loud Sunday Times bestseller is back and funnier than ever! Perfect for fans of WHY MUMMY DRINKS.

When her 18-year-old twins leave for university, single mum Nadia’s life changes in ways she never expected: her Glasgow flat feels suddenly huge, laundry doesn’t take up half her week, and she no longer has to buy ‘the Big Milk’. After almost two decades of putting everyone else first, Nadia is finally taking care of herself. And with a budding romance with new boyfriend Jack, She’s never felt more alive.

That is, until her son Alfie drops out of university, and Nadia finds her empty nest is empty no more. With a heartbroken teenager to contend with, Nadia has to ask herself: is it ever possible for a mother to get her own life back? And can Jack and Nadia’s relationship survive having a sulky teenager around?

A gloriously funny and uplifting new book perfect for fans of Gill Sims and Jill Mansell.

Rating: four-stars

 

Nadia is embracing the HEN – Happy Empty Nester – after her twins left for University. And then she meets the fabulous, funny and warm Jack – and they hit it off immediately. Going from full on parenting to a feeling of being a desired woman again is a change that Nadia enjoys very much – and of course uses the situation, the freedom of an empty house and dating again. But then Alfie comes back home earlier as expected and it turns out he’s dropped out of uni – and now Nadia has to juggle her role as a girlfriend and a mother and find a balance and a happy medium. But things don’t go too smoothly.

Nadia was great – in her early 50s and doing nude modelling for an art class and an illustrator and I really liked her life approach. I know, Nadia’s attitude towards Alfie was sometimes soooo overblown – the way she was treating her son like a baby was getting on the nerves, but on the other hand I could absolutely understand her, the desire to help him, to save him the troubles was ringing the bell – I mean, my daughter is only 7, so I have some time still, but oh my god, I’m sure you know this feeling when you simply want to do things for your child just for the sake of it, for some serenity, and because you just cant watch how they’re doing it, right? And Alfie was just such a typical teenager, you want to hug him and in the next second to bang his head on the wall. Really well developed and described, feeling like an adult but deep inside still a child relying on his mum. The ways Nadia would go to defend him only showed that no matter how old our kids are, the inner lioness is going to wake up and simply kill the ones who dare to criticise her kids – you, as mum, are allowed to do this, but not other people, don’t forget it 🙂
Jack was also brilliant – working in a charity shop, divorced and raising his daughter together with his ex, trying to be a good dad and – in my opinion – doing a great job on this front, looking after his work colleagues as well. There was something that happened in his past that he didn’t want to talk about, something really sad and difficult.

The story is told from Nadia and Jack’s points of view and it was great to see their perspective on the same things – that often, as it usually happens, was different. I really liked the romantic aspect, from the very beginning to the end. It was lovely, and warm, and didn’t run smooth, with some tricky moments and sharp turns. There were no silly games between the characters, however they also had problems to communicate sometimes – usually when it came to their families! It was realistically painted, showing what it actually looks like, and feels like – for all involved – when single parents meets someone.

This was a totally nice and relatable book. The pace was only right, the amount of desperation I felt towards Alfie and Nadia as well, and it felt so refreshingly honest and genuine. It’s for sure going to resonate with any parent, not only those whose kids have left home – we were all teenagers, so we know how the wind blows.
“The Mum Who Got Her Life Back” is a down – to – earth story, tackling some real life problems and struggles but without being too depressive, too serious. It touches upon relationships, new and old, and their dynamics, everyday life and problems that it brings and this all written in a very accessible, light writing style. It is full of humour mixed with bittersweet moments and families and characters that will make you smile and also desperate and showing you that you’re not alone here, that we all have to balance the needs of our children, family, friends, sometimes ex – partners and eventually our own. Recommended!

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Cuckoo by Sophie Draper / Blog Tour

Cuckoo by Sophie Draper

 

41061962Publisher: Avon

Publishing Date: 29th November 2018

Source:  Received from the publisher via NetGalley, thank you!

Number of pages: 297

Genre: General Fiction (Adult), Mystery & Thrillers

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Paperback

 

 

 

Synopsis:

’Spooky and absorbing. I was gripped from the first page!’ CASS GREEN

There’s a stranger in your house…

When her stepmother dies unexpectedly, Caro returns to her childhood home in Derbyshire. She hadn’t seen Elizabeth in years, but the remote farmhouse offers refuge from a bad relationship, and a chance to start again.

But going through Elizabeth’s belongings unearths memories Caro would rather stay buried. In particular, the story her stepmother would tell her, about two little girls and the terrible thing they do.

As heavy snow traps Caro in the village, where her neighbours stare and whisper, Caro is forced to question why Elizabeth hated her so much, and what she was hiding. But does she really want to uncover the truth?

A haunting and twisty story about the lies we tell those closest to us, perfect for fans of Ruth Ware and Cass Green.

my-review

Caro, after the death of her mother and then father, has been raised by her stepmother. They’ve never seen eye to eye, so when after her death Caro finds out that she – together with her sister with whom she had grown apart – has inherited the house, she’s surprised. Even more so when her sister relinquishes the inheritance. Recently separated from a boyfriend, and with job as an illustrator that she can do everywhere, Caro decides to take on the task of clearing the house out, while waiting for the probate to clear. Soon strange things begin to happen at the house, and Caro starts to ask herself what’s happening. She also finds things that she doesn’t remember from her childhood, photos and different things that make her start to wonder why can’t she remember so much from her childhood? Why did Elizabeth hate her so much?

The author managed to capture the creepy, chilling atmosphere however there was no tension for me. It started in a great way, intriguing and full of questions, the odd things happening at the house Caro was staying at were intriguing at the beginning but quickly it dramatically slowed down, the things started to feel repetitive and not so dramatic, and yes, the author’s writing is very descriptive and vivid but I could live without reading about every single detail of the house, or the town – there was no progress to the story. And so I started to skim – reading: firstly because the pace was much too slow for my liking, and secondly, because I desperately wanted to arrive at the final twist that so many of the reviewers rave about. And when it happened… Well, guys, what shall I say, I’ve guessed it already long ago. I was of course hoping till the last moment that it wouldn’t finish in such obvious way, but well, it did.

I couldn’t put my finger on the main character. I suppose I should have compassion with her, fell for her but I simply couldn’t understand her actions. She seemed to be very naive and to make every mistake possible, and to make any bad choice possible. Yes, usually characters that have flaws feel much more realistic but not Caro, and moreover, she didn’t learn by her own mistakes. While sometimes it could make you, the reader, feel compassion, maybe understanding, for me it was just frustrating. She never tried to overcome her problems and fear, she just went with the flow, agreeing to everything that was happening in her life. Laptop suddenly gone? Oh well, it simply happens, right? The end left me thinking if Carol really did get her “happy end” or if she was too gullible to see the real intensions of Craig, or what were his intentions, to be honest.

The setting of the house, creepy, old and solitary, out of a small town, with unfriendly neighbours, in the middle of winter, snowed in couldn’t be better. But the potential in this simply hasn’t been taken.

It’s not that I didn’t like this book but I also didn’t love it. There was a great potential to it and it pained me to see that it wasn’t utilised. The turns and twists were there, and the author tried to make them unpredictable and unique. There is the constant feeling of isolation and that something is going to happen which is necessary in this kind of books. I think that the problem is with me, and I’m guessing that if I haven’t been reading so many books in this genre, I’d enjoyed “Cuckoo” much more. So if you’re into a slow – paced creepy story about abused and neglected child, about family secrets, about hate and revenge with a ting of gothic to it simply try this novel.

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A Christmas Gift by Sue Moorcroft / Blog Tour

A Christmas Gift by Sue Moorcroft

 

 

41562375Publisher: Avon

Publishing Date: 1st November 2018

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 484

Genre: General Fiction (Adult), Women’s Fiction

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Hardcover

 

 

 

Synopsis:

‘I love all of Sue Moorcroft’s books!’
Katie Fforde

A sumptuous, festive read from the #1 bestseller, Sue Moorcroft.

Georgine loves Christmas. The festive season always brings the little village of Middledip to life. But since her ex-boyfriend walked out, leaving her with crippling debts, Georgine’s struggled to make ends meet.

To keep her mind off her worries, she throws herself into organising the Christmas show at the local school. And when handsome Joe Blackthorn becomes her assistant, Georgine’s grateful for the help. But there’s something about Joe she can’t quite put her finger on. Could there be more to him than meets the eye?

Georgine’s past is going to catch up with her in ways she never expected. But can the help of friends new and old make this a Christmas to remember after all?

Curl up with the gorgeous new book from the Sunday Times bestseller, perfect for fans of Carole Matthews and Trisha Ashley.

My Review

Georgine France’s life used to be a bed of roses, until her family fell from grace when her father has lost his construction firm, her mother left and she had to leave university and find a job. And recently, her ex – boyfriend has left her, leaving debts and bailiffs for her to deal with. She works as an event director at Middledip’s performing arts college Acting Instrumental and she loves her job, so she completely immerses herself into the organization of this event, trying to forget about her financial problems. Joe Blackthorn has just returned to the village to be Georgine’s new assistant. Nobody knows that he was someone else in the past, the child of two alcoholics, living in the wrong part of the village, often hungry and dirty. Also nobody knows that he’s a drummer of one of the most successful British bands, now back home to lick his wounds after a falling out with the band. He never supposed to meet Georgine in Acting Instumental – his old crush that he hurt when they were teenagers. Is he going to make her life even more complicated?

The characters were easy to like and they really felt so close to life and I liked how challenging their lives were and how deep the problems were. Both Georgine and Joe had unhappy pasts and they really knew some struggles, both in mental and financial aspect. I really connected with them and I fell for them, and their problems hit me truly hard. They were both so brilliantly passionate about things they loved.

There came a moment when the story started to be more of Joe than of Georgine, though I didn’t have any problem with this. I liked Joe and I’m sure I’d feel comfortable in his presence, just like Georgine did. Jeez, I must pay so much attention when writing this name, to spell it right, it’s really annoying. The name itself too. It happens sometimes, that I don’t like the main character’s name, and it was the case here but no worries, it didn’t affect my feelings towards her. Maybe I’ll just call her G. I appreciate the fact that the author touched upon some more serious issues but sometimes the way she wrote about them felt too patronizing, there was too much stressing on them and it made them feel not too natural. And it was also somehow not too real that so many of the characters suddenly had the same kind of problem with money. But hats off to Sue Moorcroft for touching upon such things as poverty and bailiffs at all, it isn’t a common theme in women’s fiction.
To be absolutely honest, the descriptions of the show and preparations were not my cup of tea and I’ve voluntarily skipped most of them – in my opinion, even if they were a part of G’s life, they were not so significant nor too important for the plot. I simply wanted more of Joe and G’s stories, they were much more interesting and had so many layers.

“A Christmas Gift”, although not too Christmassy, it succeeded in putting me in the festive mood. It was a warm, uplifting story about second chances, friendship, families, some harsh truths and living in poverty, but also about neglect and abuse. This is a book that has it all: bouncy, full of life characters, some romance, tons of troubles, humour and sadness. Sue Moorcroft’s writing style is so lovely and full of passion and compassion and she handles each of her topics with the same attention. There is depth to this story so please don’t expect only a fluffy Christmas romance, because there is much more to it, and I’m sure you’re going to enjoy this fact as much as I did.

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One Little Lie by Sam Carrington (Guest Post / Blog Tour)

Hi guys, today is my stop on Sam Carrington’s blog tour, celebrating the release of her new gripping novel “One Little Lie”. If you’re like me and likes reading guest posts then you’re for a treat today, as Sam has written a little piece on location in the novel. It’s brilliant, so put your feet high and enjoy!

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One Little Lie – on location.

Alongside the prison setting in One Little Lie,the town of Totnes, in Devon, remains a key location.Psychologist Connie Summers – who we first met in Bad Sister– has her counselling practice there. Although Connieis a central character, along with DI Lindsay Wade and DS Mack, this book is really Alice Mann’s story.

Alice is the mother of a murderer and she is struggling to come to terms with this and the impact her son’s actions have had on her and his victim’s family. She moved to Totnes to escape the past and rebuild her life, but she still feels massive guilt and so in an attempt to gain redemption she sets up asupport group for parents whose children have challenging behaviour or committed crimes. These monthly meetings take place ina church hall in the centre of Totnes. In addition to the support group, she seeks professional help from Connie, so a large part of the novel takes place in Totnes.

Totnes is a historical market town situated at the head of the estuary of the River Dart and has many beautiful features. It’s a place I love, and I visit regularly.

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The narrow streets lined with indie shops and boutiques, interior furnishers, art galleries and gift shops are quaint and offer a more unique shopping experience than the surrounding towns.

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The East Gate Arch is one of the most prominent and famous features of Totnes, it straddles the street and was originally the entrance to the old Elizabethan walled town. It was reconstructed after a devastating fire in 1990. Connie’s counselling practice is just beyond the arch, on the right going up the hill.

I really like having a few real locations in my novels, although it can be a bit restrictive. For those who also know Totnes well, they might notice I have played around a bit with the geography in parts – but hopefully not too much!

Dartmoor, specifically Haytor, doesn’t play a central role in One Little Lie as it has in my previous novels, but it does feature briefly. Andagain, for One Little Lie, I have used the fictional town of Coleton – which is situated a few miles from Totnes.The police station, where DI Wade and DS Mack are based, is located there, and it’s where Connie lives.

I think I will continue to set my novels in Devon, it’s a place I’ve lived all my life and there are so many beautiful locations that I could use. I’m sure it will continue to inspire my stories and be the perfect backdrop.

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The Mum Who’d Had Enough by Fiona Gibson (Blog Tour)

The Mum Who’d Had Enough by Fiona Gibson

 

35886922Publisher: Avon

Publishing Date: 14th June 2018

Source:  Received from the publisher in return for an honest review, thank you!

Number of pages: 384

Genre: General Fiction

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Paperback

 

 

Synopsis:

After sixteen years of marriage, Nate and Sinead Turner have a nice life. They like their jobs, they like their house and they love their son Flynn. Yes, it’s a very nice life.

Or, at least Nate thinks so. Until, one morning, he wakes to find Sinead gone and a note lying on the kitchen table listing all the things he does wrong or doesn’t do at all.

Nate needs to show Sinead he can be a better husband – fast. But as he works through Sinead’s list, his life changes in unexpected ways. And he starts to wonder whether he wants them to go back to normal after all. Could there be more to life than nice?

Rating: four-stars

Other than usually, when it is woman thinking that her marriage is working perfectly well and then felling off their high horse, this time it is Nate that is perfectly happy with his life, his wife, son and job as a driving examiner. However, one day he gets up and instead of a cup of hot coffee he finds the kitchen empty but a note listing all his faults, left by his wife Sinead. Who, as it seems, has just left him. Nate absolutely doesn’t know what to do – with the note, with his life, with their son Flynn who stayed with him – basically, he can’t believe, and won’t believe, that his marriage is over. Is he going to win Sinead back? Is it really so simple, to change and fix all the faults, or is it something bigger, deeper?

The author has a great way with words and she writes about serious things also with a pinch of salt – the balance between seriousness and humour works pretty well in this book. Thanks to Ms Gibson’s light and welcoming writing style you will immediately feel a part of this story and you’ll be quickly drawn into it. What I also liked in this novel is that it wasn’t over – done, too sugary, that it was realistic and down – to – earth and it showed also the darkest sides of life, in a very accessible and not disheartening way.

What I missed was Sinead’s perspective. Yes, she has written the list where she listed the problems but so truly, deeply I really had no idea what her problem was. The book was told mostly from Nate’s point of view and honestly, so as he told this, they led a normal partnership, a marriage. If she wanted something different – well, it just wasn’t made clear enough in this story, or maybe it was, but it was not motivated, explained. Sinead really came across as bored and as one who didn’t know what she really wants. She sounded so unhappy and honestly guys, instead of having this overwhelming feeling that I’d love to hug her and console her, I just couldn’t completely warm to her. She’s just left her husband, leaving only a list of his faults – where did it come from??? Yes, she was taken for granted, I admit, she’s always put her husband and their son before herself and I totally get it that she’s had enough, who of us doesn’t have such feelings as well, but I think she should have approached the matter differently – I think this is this list thing that is just bugging me. She’s finally realised it’s time to put herself first, and I’m the first to give her the standing ovation, it’s just the way she has chosen to do so that simply doesn’t work for me. I really get the poor Nate and his confusion when out of the blue his wife leaves him. He lived in obliviousness for so long and I am not defending him, oh no, but how could he realise that something is wrong when Sinead didn’t talk with him? We all know that women are from Venus and men are from Mars and they need simple words to explain what we feel. I just couldn’t help the feeling that Sinead’s part in the collapse of her marriage was as significant as Nate’s.
Tanzie’s perspective has added so much freshness and humour and sunshine.

I’m giving 3 stars to the plot that was not developed enough for my liking – I mean, the idea was there, the potential was there but it was not delivered – and 5 stars for the characters of Nate and Tanzie and the brilliant writing style and the very few best in the world one – liners. Altogether, “The Mum Who’d Had Enough” was a heart – warming and “ringing the bell” story of a broken marriage, about relationships, family dynamics, second chances and friendship. It also has one of the most gorgeous covers ever, this bright and shiny yellow is simply beautiful and it has this brilliant summery vibe to it. Fans of Fiona Gibson are going to adore this book, that’s for sure, and the new readers will certainly fall in love with this author and her writing. Recommended!

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