Last of the Summer Moët by Wendy Holden

Last of the Summer Moët by Wendy Holden

 

 

51q8w2bwg1elPublisher: Head of Zeus

Publishing Date: 1st February 2018

Series: Laura Lake Novel #2

Source:  Received from publisher via NetGalley  in return for an honest review, thank you!

Number of pages: 400

Genre: General Fiction, Humour

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Hardcover (out on 08.03.2018)

 

 

 

Synopsis:

Top reporter Laura Lake has struck journalistic gold.

She’s discovered a super-exclusive English village where the rich and famous own weekend retreats. Where film stars, Turner-prize winners and Cabinet ministers park their helicopters outside the gastropub and buy £100 sourdough loaves from the deli.

Outsiders are strictly forbidden. But luckily Laura’s best friend Lulu, a logo-obsessed socialite with a heart as huge as her sunglasses, suddenly fancies a quiet life in the country. The door to this enchanted rural idyll opens for Laura. Revealing a great professional opportunity.

Can Laura write an exposé before the snobbish villagers suss her true identity? And before the world’s poshest pub quiz triggers a political scandal not seen since Profumo?

Rating: three-stars

To be totally honest, I was afraid if this book, “Last of the Summer Moët” is going to be something for me – I tried to read the first novel in the series and I gave up but this time I just wanted to read it with an open mind and let the author to take me on one of the most farcical journeys ever. I think it’s not a read for everybody – it’s so crazy and so ridiculous, you could say too crazy and too ridiculous, and it’s probably not going to hit all funny bones. It wasn’t my kind of read but I liked it – maybe because I already knew what I can expect from Laura, so it didn’t take me by such a great surprise. Yes, I skipped some passages, and there were moments that it was just too much of everything for me, but I finished the story and I also smiled when reading it. Even though it is a second book in the series, you can positively read it as a stand – alone.

So Laura Lake is back. Laura, the deputy editor of the glossy magazine, Society. She keeps hearing about a very secret village Great Hording, populated by the Britain’s best – top managers, bank chefs, actors, writers, government ministers… Could be a big story for Laura, right? So with the help of her best friend Lulu she infiltrates the village and discovers many secrets and events that should never see the light of day. In the meantime, an old enemy appears at work again, ex – boyfriend playing the new James Bond resurfaces again and the present boyfriend comes and goes as he wants.

To absolutely, totally enjoy it, the fact that it was too far – fetched and there were many characters whose actions were not relatable at all stood in the way. Some of the features for the “Society” magazine were not only verging onto the bizarre, they were bizarre. And I understand that it is fiction but the plot has to at least have some threads that seem real and relatable. However, even with the plot being so overdone, with the characters trying to outdo each other in every aspect of life, with a top – secret village that doesn’t appear on any map, the author handles everything mostly really well. All the different strands of plot and storyline at the first sight seemed to have nothing in common, however in the end they come together and all this far – fetched on many levels aside, there comes a moment that you take it all as a normal thing – you just get used to all this ridiculousness and hilarity and overdoing, and to your surprise the story makes sense.

Laura is probably the most sane element of this story and I liked her humour and her resilience. The thing that didn’t work so much for me was her in and out relationship with Harry who kept disappearing, and I must admit that it was more irritating than intriguing.

There were tons of very eclectic characters in this story, especially in out top secret village Great Hording, and I didn’t even try to keep track of them, to be honest, and I don’t think it was necessary. Probably because of the great number of them, they just felt a little under – developed. Some of the descriptions were too over – done and I just had a feeling that the author has tried too much.

Altogether, it was a light and entertaining read, albeit not totally right up to my alley when it comes to the sense of humour and sometimes absurd plot. Nevertheless it can hit your funny bone and I’d really recommend to you to read this book – it’s different, it’s unusual and sometimes this is all what we need.

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Last of the Summer Moët by Wendy Holden / #BlogTour + Extract

Hi guys, here I am again, with another blog tour this week (yes. I love blog tours!) This time it’s my stop on Wendy Holden’s tour for her new release “Last of the Summer Moët”, a second book in the Laura Lake’s series, and today I have an extract from the book for you – review to come very soon!

EXTRACT

‘What did you think? she asked Harry. He had seemed rather annoyingly

unmoved by the fact she had once gone out with James Bond.

‘I liked that bit when he got clubbed and shoved in the vat of

baked beans,’ Harry replied.

‘Shame he came round before he got to the canning machine.’ Laura smiled. Perhaps Harry was jealous after all. The baked beans episode had reminded her of the horrible flat where Caspar had lived at his lowest ebb. The loo had lacked a seat and the only utensil had been an unwashed spatula that the four or five residents  – all male  – shared to eat beans straight out of the tin.

‘Do you think that sort of thing really happens?’ she asked.

‘What  – a protocol that could destroy the world with poison gas from contaminated baked beans?’Harry gave an incredulous snort.

‘Well, all of it. The spy thing.’ Harry grinned.

‘If you’re asking me whether James Bond is an accurate reflection of the security services…’

‘Which I could be,’ Laura returned. Harry was always infuriatingly elusive about what he knew of MIs 5 and 6. But he had to know something. All Harry’s exposés involved international miscreants, and it seemed unlikely he investigated them without official help. Their first date had been at the Not Dead Yet Club, a place awash with foreign correspondents and diplomats. That Harry was a spy himself did not seem out of the question. Perhaps he, not Caspar, was the real James Bond.

‘…the answer is…’Harry went on.

‘Yes?’

‘That I really wouldn’t know. Shall we get a chicken katsu curry?

’They were passing an Itsu. Laura, who had been brought up on a diet of French classics by her Parisian grandmother, shuddered. She found Harry’s lack of interest in food both baffling and appalling. His idea of Sunday lunch was a bag of steak ridge-cut chips followed by a packet of Skittles. Inside the takeaway, Laura tried not to wince as she watched the server ladle the curry gloop over what had been a perfectly respectable chicken escalope.

‘I don’t know how you can eat that stuff,’she said as they walked out, Harry’s dinner in a plastic bag.

‘Boarding school,’he replied easily.

‘The food was horrendous. Dead Man’s Leg and Nun’s Toenails.’

‘Oh God, yes. We had this thing called Skeleton Stew…’

Only after offering up her own memories of school food did Laura realise he had steered her off the subject of spies completely, and they were now turning into her street. Laura lived in Cod’s Head Row, Shoreditch. It was an area of London once synonymous with grinding poverty but now synonymous with grinding affluence. Quite literally, given the preponderance of artisan coffee roasters.

 

About the book:

Last of the Summer Moët by Wendy Holden
Published: February 1st 2018 by Head of Zeus
51q8w2bwg1el
Blurb: 

Top reporter Laura Lake has struck journalistic gold.

She’s discovered a super-exclusive English village where the rich and famous own weekend retreats. Where film stars, Turner-prize winners and Cabinet ministers park their helicopters outside the gastropub and buy £100 sourdough loaves from the deli.

Outsiders are strictly forbidden. But luckily Laura’s best friend Lulu, a logo-obsessed socialite with a heart as huge as her sunglasses, suddenly fancies a quiet life in the country. The door to this enchanted rural idyll opens for Laura. Revealing a great professional opportunity.

Can Laura write an exposé before the snobbish villagers suss her true identity? And before the world’s poshest pub quiz triggers a political scandal not seen since Profumo?

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That Girl by Kate Kerrigan / #BlogTour

So guys, after the Christmas and New year break I am baaaaack! And with the second blog tour of this year, and I am really excited to be a part of this one as I am a great and devoted fan of Kate Kerrigan. Have you read “The Dress” yet? If not, do not hesitate, it was a brilliant, brilliant read! But yes, she’s back with a new novel of hers, this lovely author, and this time she takes us to the London’s swinging sixties! If you follow the blog tour you can read some extracts from this novel and today I am sharing my review of this thought – provoking story.

That Girl by Kate Kerrigan

35678135Publisher: Head of Zeus

Publishing Date: 1st January 2018

Source:  Received from publisher via NetGalley in return for an honest review, thank you!

Number of pages: 400

Genre: General Fiction (Adult), Women’s Fiction

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Hardcover (out on 08.02.2018)

 

 

Synopsis:

You can escape a place. But you can’t escape yourself.

Hanna flees the scene of a terrible crime in her native Sligo. If she can just vanish, re-invent herself under a new name, perhaps the police won’t catch up with her. London seems the perfect place to disappear.

Lara has always loved Matthew and imagined happy married life in Dublin. Then comes the bombshell – Matthew says he wants to join the priesthood. Humiliated and broken-hearted, Lara heads to the most godless place she can find, King’s Road, Chelsea.

Matthew’s twin sister, Noreen, could not be more different from her brother. She does love fiance John, but she also craves sex, parties and fun. Swinging London has it all, but without John, Noreen is about to get way out of her depth.

All three girls find themselves working for Bobby Chevron – one of London’s most feared gangland bosses – and it’s not long before their new lives start to unravel.

 
Rating: three-half-stars

The story follows three young women from Ireland that more or less suddenly find themselves in the London’s swinging 60’s. It is my second book lately that was set in this time in London and I must admit that “That Girl” was much better than the other one – it was fast – paced and, above all, the characters felt realistic, they were so vivid and so easily brought to life by the author. So back to our main characters – they are very different but there is one thing that they have in common – they all run away from something. Hanna’s was probably the most shocking story and I so incredibly fell for her – after her mother has died, her step – father started to abuse her and she lived her life as his prisoner. She could do nothing about it – let’s not forget, it was Ireland and he was a very respected local doctor – until one day, when after coming to her limits Hanna leaves for London, trying to cover her tracks…

Lara is in love with Matthew, she’s always has been, and already envisions them married. However, one day, just out of the blue, Matthew tells her something that shatters Lara’s whole world. To flee the humiliation, Lara decides to leave for London to start a new life there. She quickly finds herself in the big city and I probably liked her most out of the three girls.

Noreen was the one that I liked the least. She was this kind of  person that would elbow her way to the top and it’s not my favourite kind of person. She’s Matthew’s twin sister and Lara’s best friend. She can’t believe what her brother has done to her friend, however after seeing them both, Matthew and Lara, leaving the little town in Ireland to follow their dreams, she gets itchy feet as well and she decides that while she loves her fiancée John very much, she first wants to see and try different life, to taste the freedom – and so she goes to London as well.

All the three girls end up living together in one apartment above the gangster’s nightclub, and initially also working together but then their lives take different paths.

 There were plenty of moments that took me absolutely by surprise and I would never in a million years guess that the story is going to take such turns! It starts telling Hanna’s story and then introducing us to the other girls, and it was so fast – paced that I didn’t have time to think what the three girls can have in common. I think Hanna’s story was the most shocking one, and I liked this girl, I simply liked her and I wished all best for her. Also Lara was my kind of person, she was not afraid to follow her dreams and to try. She wanted people to think she’s a tough cookie but there was also this vulnerable side to her. And as I have already mentioned, Noreen was my least favourite character, while you can admire her chutzpah and determination, especially in the 60’s Ireland, she was too egoistic for me, thinking only about herself and not respecting other people and their wishes.

 It was different to what I was expecting but of course it’s not the book’s fault but I just had a feeling it’s too much of everything. It often felt too far – fetched and the ending felt much too rushed and somehow unrealistic. Everything fell always so neatly in the right places and you just knew that no matter what and how, everything is going to turn OK. I was expecting more depth from this author, and while this book was really great to read I had a feeling that there was tons of potential that was not made use of. It was as if there was an idea but the delivery and conclusion of it was missing.

The author has brought the swinging London perfectly to life and I love all the descriptions of the places and clothes (but again, I had a feeling that the author started something, like That Girl, described few dresses and then it was all. A few comparisons to some models of those times and nothing more. It just often felt that some of the subplots started but weren’t finished, or ended too abruptly). The atmosphere was there on the pages and the characters were changing, turning into people they wanted to be.

 So yes, guys, this book gave me a  headache – I liked it, please don’t get me wrong, but after reading “The Dress” by the same author I was expecting something more deep and complex. “That Girl” was about friendship, about love and relationships, about hurt and betrayal. The book was good guys, it was a mix of suspense, romance, dark comedy but maybe this was my problem because it felt as if the story doesn’t know what it wants to be. However, Kate Kerrigan is a great story – teller and this was a really well written and character driven story set in the swinging sixties in London. The book has it all: fashion, drama, sex, gangsters and crime but in the foreground there are stories of three different girls, Hanna, Lara and Noreen. There is a lot happening and the author mixes perfectly humour with drama, tragedies and funny moments. The author is not afraid to write about abuse and violence but it’s such an integral part of this story, and even if there are some moments with all the gory details for you, it works in this book, and also you have a feeling that it was deserved and couldn’t be different. Recommended!

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The Country Set by Fiona Walker – #BlogTour + Extract

Hi guys, hope you all have wonderful Friday. I am thrilled to be hosting Fiona Walker’s fiona-walkerblog tour on my blog today and I have an extract from her newest novel, “The Country Set”, for you. The book sounds brilliant and I am incredibly looking towards reading it – would be done already and apologies for not being able but I am really poorly and reading is the last thing on my mind. Though I promise to get into the story asap. In the meantime, let’s enjoy the extract!

 

‘…and there’s a John le Carr. film on BBC One we can all watchone night next week – or is it Jim Carrey? The one you both like,’Pip was saying loudly to an out-of-sight Lester as she filled nets planning a few evenings of company for him and the Captain.Both men claimed to prefer to be alone, the stallion man drinkingcaramel-dark tea in his stable cottage while his boss downed claretin the main house, but she didn’t believe it, and they loved theirtelevision. It must be terribly lonely here nowadays. The Captainwas deeply antisocial, rarely stepping across his threshold, tooproud to use the walking frame Pip had acquired for him on loanfrom the NHS, along with a shower seat and grab-rails. He hadonce been a regular at the Jugged Hare, she’d been told, always talking horse, part of a ribald farming and hunting set who hadbeen yesteryear’s wild men of the Comptons. It was hard toimagine that now: her curmudgeonly charge had his beady eyesfixed on the television screen all the time.

 

The Captain’s fierce raptor of a wife, Ann, had employedPip, reluctantly taking on her only applicant for the role of part-timehousekeeper, a thirty-something former job-centre manager. Pip had recently started up her Home Comforts carer serviceafter taking voluntary redundancy to look after her ageingparents: ‘You obviously didn’t do a very good job as they’re bothnow dead, but at least English is your first language and you livein the village, so you’ll have to do.’ There had been impatience inAnn Percy’s manner, which Pip took to be typical of her breed,but it turned out her need to find someone to look after her gout-riddenhusband was urgent: she’d underplayed her on-off battlewith cancer to family and friends for almost a decade and the disease was spreading into her lungs and liver. Just three monthslater Ann Percy’s funeral had brought so many mourners to thevillage they’d opened the church meadows for extra parking.

 

Pip was honoured that the immensely practical, no-nonsenseAnn Percy had entrusted her house and husband to her care, theformer’s beauty more than capable of making up for the latter’sbeastliness. She gazed lovingly out from the hay store now at thegolden-stone tiles, tiny top dormers and tall chimneys visible overthe stable-yard roofs, the fast-climbing sun creeping across them.

 

In the village, the stud was a star attraction architecturally, itsclock-tower and pretty house a landmark that visitors saw first asthey approached Compton Magna along the die-straight narrowlane up from the Fosse Way, causing many a hire car to veeronto the verge towards its paddocks. The oh-so-handsome face,with its symmetrical sash windows, flirty dormers and limestonequoins was like a perfect doll’s house.

 

The main house at Compton Magna Stud had never been givena name. Unlike its Stables Cottage and Groom’s Flat, it wasn’tseparately listed in the records of the Eyngate Estate to which ithad once belonged. For years, it was commonly known as PercyPlace, and so many letters were addressed thus that it was assumedto be historically correct, but family accommodation was officiallyindistinguishable from horse. Pip rather liked its anonymity, likethe mares in its oldest stud books with only stable names writtenin. Lester had explained that their bloodline was more importantthan their individual merits. That was how she felt as its part-timechâtelaine. Just Pip. A tiny part of its history, and a seed that mightfind a place to root there.

 

Whenever she introduced herself to somebody new, Pip wouldtell them, ‘My dad nicknamed me Pipsqueak. Everyone calls mePip.’ It wasn’t strictly true. Both parents had always addressed heras Pauline. Even after their deaths, she could still hear their voicesin her head when someone called her by her given name. She hadchosen to bury Pauline Edwards with them and Pip, the village’shappiest helper and bounciest baker, had been born.

 

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The Mothers of Lovely Lane by Nadine Dorries / Blog Tour

Hi guys, happy Wednesday and welcome to my stop on Nadine Dorries blog tour. The Mothers of Lovely Lane is my first book by this author but for sure not the last – Nadine has incredible way with words and has created a beautiful, poignant novel and I am already looking forward to reading other books in this series. If you’re looking for a captivating historical fiction that you can lose yourself in, than The Mothers of Lovely Lane may be the perfect book for you!

The Mothers of Lovely Lane by Nadine Dorries



34862490Publisher: Head of Zeus

Publishing Date: 15th June 2017

Series: Lovely Lane #3

Source:  Received from the publisher in return for an honest review!

Number of pages: 464

Genre:  Historical Fiction

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Hardcover | Paperback (out on 18.03.2018)

 

Synopsis:

From the bestselling author of The Angels of Lovely Lane, The Four Streets and Ruby Flynn.

Noleen Delaney is one of an army of night cleaners at St Angelus hospital in Liverpool. Since her husband was injured in the war, she has supported her five children. With help from her eldest, Bryan – a porter’s lad – the family just about gets by.

When Finn, her youngest, passes the eleven plus exam, Noleen feels faint. Allowing Finn to attend the grammar will stretch her purse too far.

When Bryan steps in to help, the results rock the St Angelus community. As the nurses of Lovely Lane near their final exams, Noleen will find herself tested, and her heart broken. Just how far can a mother’s love stretch?

Rating: four-stars





The Mothers of Lovely Lane is a third book in The Lovely Lane series, but it was new to me. I haven’t read the two previous books and, as usually, when starting reading series not in the right order I was somehow anxious but now I can absolutely positively state that this book can be read as a stand – alone. Sure, there are some flashbacks and glimpses into the past but it didn’t make the story in any way confusing.

What made it confusing however, and I must add it right at the beginning, was the incredibly huge number of the characters and the way the story was told itself. I must admit that I almost gave up on identifying who is who, to whom they belong and what is their story as there were so many of them. And also, with it being a rather long book, the fact that sometimes we needed two or three chapters to come to an event that was mentioned as happening right now, it just made me feel the whole story was dragging on and honestly, there were moments that I was losing my patience and interest and I wanted to bang on the table and shout hurry up, please, let’s something happen, I want that ward to be opened eventually! But that’s just me. And actually I don’t have more things to whine about, so let’s start gushing now, right?

The story is set in a gritty area of Liverpool and mostly revolves around St. Angelus hospital, a place where people come for help when they are sick and injured, and it also links all the characters in this story: our main characters but also the doctors, other nurses and the St. Angelus mafia. Among the many characters we have Dessie, helping other families who have suffered in the war or who have lost beloved ones. There are Biddy and Elsie, those so much needed characters, the busybodies who knows everything about everyone but whose presence lightens the situations so often, and Noleen, who works as a cleaner then to go home to take care about her husband injured in the war and their children. She was an incredible character and I think that every heart will go to her, as she did her utmost to keep the family alive. This feeling of community spirit, of friendship and of sharing this something special that only people who were victims to wars can share is overwhelming and is so easily brought to life by the author. The characters were all hard working, yet they were the people who wore their hearts on their sleeves and supported each other in this incredible, non – egoistical way.

The author has incredible way with words. She is able to effortlessly transport you into the fictional word of her characters. She vividly shows the harsh reality of post – war times but she also creates world full of hope and balances it with beautiful, poignant moments. There is a lot of friendship, drama, heartbreak, compassion and love, about family bonds and relationships, about the determination to not only survive but also to help. It shows the true sense of being a part of community. It was so heart – breaking to see that all of the characters in this book were somehow touched by the war, that they all were victims to drama and that they were not spared any tragedy. They truly experienced a lot in their lives and I admired this side of them, because they were people who really have seen and experienced a lot in their lives and had something to tell. They have depth to them, they have complex personalities and distinctive voices.

Altogether, The Mothers of Lovely Lane was moving, lovely historical fiction about changes – and, as we know, changes can be good or not, and this story gives us a wide view without judging. It was about strength and determination and written in absolutely beautiful, vivid way. Nadine Dorries may be a new author to me but I will be looking to read more of her books. In the meantime, I can only recommend this epic historical novel to you.


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The Late Blossoming of Frankie Green by Laura Kemp

The Late Blossoming of Frankie Green

by Laura Kemp

 

Publisher: Aria

Publishing Date: 1st June 2016

Source:  Copy provided by the publisher via NetGalley, thank you!.

Number of pages: 368

Genre: Romance, Women’s Fiction

 Buy the Book: Kindle

 

 Synopsis:

A laugh-out-loud, feel good, romantic comedy, which will take you on an enlightening emotional rollercoaster. Perfect for the fans of Sophie Kinsella and Jane Costello.

Frankie Green’s happy ever after is put on hold when her childhood sweetheart husband complains things are boring in bed.

When he asks for some space, she sets out to win him back by getting herself a sex education.

Little does she know that her hilarious, tender and embarrassing journey of enlightenment is going to change everything…

A story full of humour, heartache and happiness, of friendship, coming of age and overcoming insecurity.

Rating: 4/5

 

„The Late Blossoming of Frankie Green” is Laura Kemp’s third release, and the second book by this author that I’ve read. Actually, as soon as I’ve heard about this book, seen the cover and read the synopsis I knew that I need to read it – it sounds so daring, unique and different, and provocative as well, and when I spotted that the title is available on NetGalley, I quickly clicked „request” and waited, hoping to be approved.

The story started in a brilliant, funny way and I so hoped it’s going to continue like this, but unfortunately soon, very soon, as in the first chapters, it changed the tone a little and went on like this. And by „like this” I mean that the author has concentrated on the smallest details, such like describing how each of the characters looked like, mentioning the last freckle on their noses, for example, and also the story, instead of gaining speed, was held on a very steady level. I also thought that the book is going to follow Frankie and Frankie only, so it came as a little surprise that it also concentrates on Frankie’s friends, Em and Letty. I don’t mean it was bad or that it didn’t suit the story, it just surprised me as the blurb mentions only Frankie.

Our Frankie. She’s your normal woman, a neighbour, a girl who loves her husband to bits. She thinks that everything runs smoothly in her marriage. That is, until one day she’s surprised by her husband Jason expressing some sexual desires and stating that Frankie is not at all experienced in bed, and that he needs more excitement, and that he needs a break. Because Frankie is not experienced in bed, let me repeat this. And also because their life is very predictable – shortly, he needs to see if there are other options, to explore the world a little. But mostly because of a once in a week sex in a missionary position only. Oh guys, to say that Frankie didn’t see it coming would be an understatement! It hurt ME to see how shocked she was, how she didn’t expect it, how she was sure that their quiet life is this what they both need. But well, if Jason really means it… Frankie doesn’t transform into a vamp or nymphomaniac on the spot, oh no, but she decides on a very courageous step and takes a sex – teacher. She’s desperate to get Jason back – well, yes, she is afraid to come out of her shell – but she’s determined and won’t hesitate to change. I must say, I liked Frankie, and I admired to what extent she’s willing to go only to get her husband back. If he’s worth it? Well, this is the other thing. If she’ll get him back at all? This you must read for yourself.
And so our Frankie embarks on a sexual journey, and the list of things she wanted to learn differentiate between spanking, role playing, erotica and some other interesting things, and when she and her teacher eventually got to their lesson, it was both hilarious and touching, and it felt so genuine when the author wrote about their feelings at those moments, and she also brilliantly captured how difficult it was for both of them.

Frankie’s best friends are Em and Letty, and their stories are also very significant for the book. Those two have their own demons to overcome, their lives have thrown a curveball or two at them and they have their own challenges. In their own ways those two women also found themselves afresh, they developed and blossomed and found what it is that they want to do and how they want to do it. The story is told from the three friends’ points of view and we are taken on a journey where we learn about the women’s lives and everything they are doing. There is lots happening in all of their lives, However, in comparison to Frankie’s story, their stories felt a little too bland and too clichéd for my liking and I had a feeling that after delivering the climax in every single one of the three stories, the plot then came to a stop and there weren’t any big surprises for us.

As much as the three women are the main characters in the story, it was Floyd, Em’s brother and Frankie’s sex – teacher who easily enchanted me. He was funny, down – to – earth, easy – going and you could see he feels comfortable in his own skin, and of course him volunteering to be Frankie’s sex – teacher had a hidden agenda, which I, personally, found incredibly sweet.

This story in a lovely way shows how the main character slowly but steadily started to come out of her shell and comfort zones, and I don’t only mean her sex – life here. It was great to see how she grows in confidence and how she realises what she really wants from life. I loved to see how Frankie starts to see herself, how she starts to appreciate herself and love the person that she is, and not the person that her husband Jason wanted her to be. Also, the other characters were neatly formed, and they also changed throughout the story, which made me rooting for them.

It’s a bit flirty, sexy, different and open and written in a very fluent way. While the two sub – plots about Frankie’s friends are a little predictable, Frankie’s story is unique, quirky and absorbing and on the whole I really enjoyed it. Frankie was really broadening her horizons and I liked how the author described her journey, with all her emotions, dilemmas, feelings – because it was not so easy for Frankie to open herself, as I can easily guess, and even though the idea of having a sex – tutor didn’t come easily to her, she nevertheless took the bull by the horns, to overcome her reservations. So if you are looking for a book with interesting, unusual plot, well – developed characters and about discovering yourself, look no further and try „The Late Blossoming of Frankie Green” by Laura Kemp.