I Looked Away by Jane Corry / Blog Tour

I Looked Away by Jane Corry

 

42184225._sy475_Publisher: Penguin Books

Publishing Date: 27th June 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher in return for an honest review, thank you!

Number of pages: 512

Genre: Mystery & Thrillers

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

YOU MADE A MISTAKE. BUT THEY’RE SAYING IT’S MURDER.

‘A fearsomely good thriller’ Nicci French

‘Sensitive and thought-provoking’ Adele Parks

‘Thrilling, emotional and pacy with a clever twist I didn’t expect’ Claire Douglas

From the Sunday Times bestselling author of My Husband’s Wife, comes a beautifully written psycholgocial thriller for fans of Lisa Jewell and Clare Mackintosh.
_____________________________________

Every Monday, 49-year-old Ellie looks after her grandson Josh. She loves him more than anyone else in the world. The only thing that can mar her happiness is her husband’s affair. But he swears it’s over now, and Ellie has decided to be thankful for what she’s got.

Then one day, while she’s looking after Josh, her husband gets a call from that woman. And just for a moment, Ellie takes her eyes off her grandson. What happens next will change her life forever.

Because Ellie is hiding something in her past.

And what looks like an accident could start to look like murder…

 

Rating: five-stars

 

“I Looked Away” by Jane Corry introduces us to Ellie, from being a young girl until she becomes grandmother. When she was 5 years old, she has witnessed her mother’s death and had to grow up with her father who then remarried a neighbour, bringing a stepmother who detested Ellie and a step – brother Michael to the family. She’s now married to an ex – University lecturer Roger, has two children and an adored grandson Josh. When she’s looking after him one Monday afternoon, something tragic happens, something that will put Ellie in prison and is going to change her whole life.
Jo has her own prison experiences but now she’s homeless, travelling from Bristol to Devon and Cornwall. She’s a Big Issue seller. They meet each other when Ellie runs away after what has happened to Josh. The stories of the two women meander around each other, back and forward in time, but do they have something in common?

The story is told from Ellie and Jo’s points of view and those two personal accounts are more than absorbing. They are mixed with little mentions of some other relationship that is like a dangerous shadow. We have two different characters that at the first sight have nothing in common but whose stories, for some reason, intertwine, meandering around each other, the dual timeline gradually converges, until we eventually get the final reveal, the whole picture emerges and the truth comes out. The author slowly paints a picture of Ellie, of her past and present, and we are able to see all the events, like the death of her mother, then getting a step – mother and brother, that shaped her to be the person she is today. The circumstances took all her happiness, carefreeness away from her, she finds herself in situations that she never should experience. She starts to feel lost and isolated and really, she never learns or comes to terms of how to deal with grief. Manipulated by her step – mother, then by her husband, Ellie’s life seems to be one huge battle.
Slowly and subtly, we get to know Jo’s background and her hidden past. Jane Corry has done such a great job writing about Jo’s time on the streets, she captured all the reality and brutality of this situation – she brings the lives of the homeless with raw honesty to the pages, and this part of the book must have been so passionately researched, enlightening us more about this subject, giving some answers, explaining.

I really like Jane Corry’s writing style – it seems so uncommitted, with distance but it works so well in this psychological thriller and you can feel author’s heart in every single word and the research that went into the story is meticulous and made it eye – opening and showing that not everything is always either black or white, that there are also other shades of grey. It’s simply extremely well written and crafted and the pace is just right, seamlessly flowing, with characters and time

“I Looked Away” was a very emotional story that touches on mental health, despair, love and loss, bullying, homelessness, about giving when you yourself don’t have much. It really captured my heart and my attention. It was incredibly well plotted, with twists and turns and mystery to solve that you know can happen at any time, teasing you all the time and making you want to read more and more, and then it comes, expected yet unexpectedly and leaves you feeling dizzy.. This was emotionally charged, captivating and taking your breath away psychological thriller, dealing in a brilliant way with some very realistic issues that people must deal with every day. Highly recommended!

 

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The Whisper Man by Alex North / Blog Tour

The Whisper Man by Alex North

 

41554707._sy475_Publisher: Penguin Books

Publishing Date: 13th June 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher in return for an honest review, thank you!

Number of pages: 368

Genre: Mystery & Thrillers

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Paperback | Paperback (out on 20.08.2019)

 

Synopsis:

In this dark, suspenseful thriller, Alex North weaves a multi-generational tale of a father and son caught in the crosshairs of an investigation to catch a serial killer preying on a small town.

After the sudden death of his wife, Tom Kennedy believes a fresh start will help him and his young son Jake heal. A new beginning, a new house, a new town. Featherbank.

But the town has a dark past. Twenty years ago, a serial killer abducted and murdered five residents. Until Frank Carter was finally caught, he was nicknamed “The Whisper Man,” for he would lure his victims out by whispering at their windows at night.

Just as Tom and Jake settle into their new home, a young boy vanishes. His disappearance bears an unnerving resemblance to Frank Carter’s crimes, reigniting old rumors that he preyed with an accomplice. Now, detectives Amanda Beck and Pete Willis must find the boy before it is too late, even if that means Pete has to revisit his great foe in prison: The Whisper Man.

And then Jake begins acting strangely. He hears a whispering at his window…

Rating: five-stars

 

Tom Kennedy and his son Jack are still grieving after the unexpected, sudden death of his beloved wife, Rebecca. She was the one that was much closer to Jack, a troubled and sensitive boy, but Tom hopes that moving to a sleepy village of Featherbank will help them to start afresh. However, they can’t settle – Jack starts to hear voices and his imaginary friend tells him details about something that happened many years ago.   Some twenty years ago, Frank Carter has been sentenced for the abduction and murder of five little boys. He was called “The Whisper Man”, as he lured the boys outside their homes whispering at the doors and windows of his victims. Now though, another little boy has gone missing, in similar way – has Carter an unknown accomplice or is this a copycat crime? DI Amanda Beck heads a desperate search operation to locate little Neil Spencer.

This was this kind of book that you want to read as quickly as possible but you also don’t want it to end, a read when you’re simply absent to the outer world because you’re so engrossed in the story. The characters were brilliantly and realistically fleshed out. It was great to have a bunch of main male characters this time, not all of them, but majority. Tom is trying so hard with Jake and he’s not perfect, he makes so many mistakes in learning that his son is just like him, trying so hard to get him right. They’re both so true to life and it makes them so likeable and believable, but they’re also slightly offbeat, and that makes them refreshing and original. Norman Collins, who collects macabre serial killer memorabilia and who’s obsessed with Whisper Man. DI Amanda Beck heads the new investigation but there is also DI Pete Willis, who has investigated in the original Whisper Man case and who’s more involved that he should be perhaps. And Frank Carter, the Whisper Man, sentenced and in prison, but still playing mind games with police. They all were so incredibly well drawn, and you’re for sure going to either love them or love to hate them, but they’re all intriguing and the kind of characters that stay with you for a long time after you’ve finished reading the book. 

I admired how well this debut author has managed to capture the feeling of tension, the frightening atmosphere and it gave me chills. Also, how well he managed with mixing the reality with the mysterious girl that only Jake could see. The writing style is compulsive and captivating and even though the subject is not the easiest one, it easily flows forward, keeping the right pace.

It’s told from Tom, Jake, DI Amanda Beck and DI Pete Willis’s points of view which make the story very complex, but Alex North has crafted it really well. Of course, he also manages to write a complicated spider web of lies and secrets that had me constantly changing my mind and questioning who is the killer – but I love it this way, and I love when I don’t know what to expect next, what’s going to happen next and to come around the corner. 

 “The Whisper Man” is a hooking, thrilling read about fatherhood, family dynamics, loss and grief with menacing tone that made me feel scared – if you are, just like me, a wimp, then don’t read this book at night. It’s multi – layered, clever and well – crafted. You know that altogether I am easily pleased with books but this one has knocked my socks off and had me glued to the pages, which, in the era of so many police – procedural and psychological thrillers is a rather seldom exception. A chilling, disturbing read with twist and turns and clever mystery – a very impressive debut by Alex North. Highly recommended! 

 

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A Cornish Summer by Catherine Alliott / Blog Tour

A Cornish Summer by Catherine Alliott

 

43805734Publisher: Penguin

Publishing Date: 13th June 2019

Source:  Received from the publisher in return for an honest review, thank you!

Number of pages: 448

Genre: General Fiction (Adult), Women’s Fiction

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

Flora’s been in love with her husband for twenty years. The trouble is, he’s been married to someone else for the past fifteen . . .

Now she’s been invited to spend the summer in the shady lanes and sandy coves of Cornwall. It should be blissful.

There’s just one small snag: she’ll be staying with her former mother-in-law, Belinda.

And Flora discovers she’s not the only one invited when her ex-husband shows up out of the blue, complete with his new wife. So now there are two small snags.

Can Flora spend the summer playing happy families with the woman who stole her husband’s heart, and the mother-in-law who might have had a hand in it?

Or will stumbling on the family secret change her mind about them all?

If you like Fern Britton, Katie Fforde and Sophie Kinsella, you’ll love this heartwarming read.

Rating: four-stars

 

Flora is a single mother, divorced for 17 years already but still crazy in love with her ex – husband Hugo, even though he’s married to his second wife for 15 years and they have twins. Nevertheless, Hugo remains a large part of her, and their son Peter, lives, taking care about his education and holidays. Now Flora is about to return to Cornwall, to Hugo’s family home, as she has been commissioned to paint a portrait of her former father – in – law. Soon it turns out that it’s more a family and friends reunion, as there are literally everybody significant to the Bellingdons’ life. But forced to confront her feelings to Hugo, Flora is going to discover some hidden family secrets.

The book introduced us at the beginning to many characters – and I really mean, many – but incredibly quickly I got to grips with them and didn’t have any problem with identifying who is who and to whom they belong in the family dynamics, so really hats off to the author for making it as uncomplicated as possible. Flora is the main one and the whole book is told from her point of view but it works. Though I must admit there were plenty of moments that I have found her frustrating, watching her living half a life and waiting for something that was impossible to happen. But altogether, she was likeable, even believable, kind and funny.

It is a relative slow burner. It felt as if the first half was this long introduction but providing us with this much needed information, dynamics, relationships for the second half that, thanks to that, felt much quicker to read. Although I must admit that it took me only one day to read this book – yes, admittedly, I had time to do nothing than read (finally!) but also it kept me glued to the pages, I simply wanted to know what’s going to happen and I was engrossed in the story. It was absorbing, and set against the lovely, vividly and colourfully described Cornish coastal setting, the writing flowing beautifully and leading to a rather satisfying conclusion.

I wouldn’t describe this book, like in the blurb, as “hilarious” romantic comedy. Yes, it was light – hearted, easily written and it had its moments, but it also touched upon some much more serious issues and the general tone was steady and maybe not deliberate but also not too light. What I missed was the promised tangled web of relationships. I was hoping for more interactions between the ex – wife, the present wife and the mother – in – law, I actually expected pulling hair out and deceiving each other. Some more interaction happened at the end of the story but, to be honest, I would love more. Also, as a horse lover I adored the scenes where the characters were riding out, the descriptions of horses and their habits but, totally frankly, the fox hunt for example went on and on, and I think, do I need to know, blow by blow, the chase, who did what and when?

Altogether, “A Cornish Summer” was a captivating, rich in details and descriptions story with an epic bunch of characters that you adore or love to hate, about old friendships, a great family saga with some twists that I didn’t see coming, with sailing, horse – riding, painting and finding love there where you’re not looking. It was full of secrets, lies, manipulation and social expectations that mixed altogether made a brilliant, perfect summer read, holiday escapism, with a great sense of place, about confronting your feelings, moving with your life. It’s perhaps not the most light – hearted romance, as the subject matter is quite serious, but everything works really well. Truly recommended!

 

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The House on the Edge of the Cliff by Carol Drinkwater / Blog Tour

The House on the Edge of the Cliff by Carol Drinkwater

 

41trrnx2ctl._sx323_bo1204203200_Publisher: Penguin

Publishing Date: 16th May  2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 448

Genre: General Fiction (Adult)

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

From bestselling author Carol Drinkwater, comes an epic story of enduring love and betrayal, from Paris in the 1960s, to the present day.

No one else knows what happened that summer. Or so she believes . . .

Grace first came to France a lifetime ago. Young and full of dreams of adventure, she met two very different men.

She fell under the spell of one. The other fell under hers.

Until one summer night shattered everything . . .

Now, Grace is living an idyllic life with her husband, sheltered from the world in a magnificent Provençal villa, perched atop a windswept cliff.

Every day she looks out over the sea – the only witness to that fateful night years ago.

Until a stranger arrives at the house. A stranger who knows everything, and won’t leave until he gets what he wants.

The past and present spectacularly collide in this gripping story of love and betrayal echoing across the decades.
_________

my-review

 

Grace fell in love with France almost a lifetime ago, when she was 16 year old girl and came there with her boyfriend Peter. Full of life and dreams then, now living a happy life in the idyllic home on the beautiful coast of Provence with – yes, Peter! However, this idyll is to be shattered with the appearance of a strange man. But is he really so strange? Did Grace used to know him and believed him to have drowned? As the past comes back to haunt Grace, she’s forced to re – examine what has happened all those years ago and at the same time to keep her family safe. Will she manage?

The characters are masterfully written and developed, and while I personally didn’t fell for them all, I nevertheless appreciated them. I must admit that I much more liked them as the adult versions from their younger ones. Grace is our main character and narrator of the story and her voice is distinctive, and there is something confessional in it, she’s not holding back, we get to know the whole truth.

The scenes set in the 1960’s in Paris were very detailed and felt as if they might have been autobiographical perhaps? So many details and so many insider knowledge were there. However, to be totally honest, these scenes were for me very slow going, I much preferred the storyline set in the present, the past simply focused too much and heavily on history and politics and it just didn’t grab me. In the end, I found myself skimming through those parts without a feeling that I’m missing on something. As the story progresses though, it gets darker and more serious, and I had a feeling that something really bad is going to happen.

Carol Drinkwater’s writing style is exquisite and her attention to the smallest details is incredible. The descriptions of nature, food, sea, weather but also feelings and emotions that were milling about on the pages of this book were mesmerizing. The setting of the story, especially the part set in France, is beautiful and I can’t imagine a better one for this book. I loved the idea of the lone house on a cliff, it was a brilliant setting for this story. The house was actually a character of its own, with its history and it changing hands in the family, being a place where everybody feels safe and loved.

There are for sure some twists throughout the story that, in the end, finishes with a satisfying conclusion. Sadly, though, this story didn’t appeal to me as much as I hoped it would – there is no particular reason for this, sometimes it works like this. It was full of dark secrets, misunderstandings and tension, riddled with tragedy. It was a multi – layered story, going back and forth in time. I really, really liked to see how the past has made the characters who they are in the present, to be a witness to all the changes, to watch them changing, making mistakes, growing and maturing. The writing style is descriptive and eloquent, and brings everything the author writes about to life. “The House on the Edge of the Cliff” was a very atmospheric novel about obsession, love, hate, betrayal, guilt and forgiveness.

 

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The Lost Letter of William Woolf by Helen Cullen / Blog Tour

The Lost Letters of William Woolf by Helen Cullen

 

42643850Publisher: Penguin

Publishing Date: 2nd May  2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 416

Genre: General Fiction (Adult)

 Buy the Book:  Kindle | Hardcover | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

SHORTLISTED FOR NEWCOMER OF THE YEAR, IRISH BOOK AWARDS

‘If you liked Harold Fry and Me Before You, you will love Cullen’s nostalgic debut. This life-affirming book will draw you in and keep you there’ Independent

‘Delightful’ Sunday Times

‘Deeply moving’ Irish Times

‘I found myself totally transported into William’s poignant and beguiling world of lost opportunities and love’ A. J. Pearce, author of Sunday Times bestseller Dear Mrs Bird

______________

Inside East London’s Dead Letters Depot, William Woolf unites lost mail with its intended recipient. White mice, a miniature grandfather clock and a full suit of armour are among the more unusual items lost then found thanks to William’s detective work.

But when he discovers a series of letters addressed only to ‘My Great Love’, everything changes. Written by Winter to a soulmate she hasn’t yet met, her heartfelt words stir William in ways he has long forgotten. Could they be destined for him? But what about his troubled marriage?

William must follow the clues in Winter’s letters to solve the mystery of his own heart.

Rating: four-stars

 

Let’s start with telling you that I loved the idea of the book – there is hope for letters that went missing or with unclear destination if they find their way to East London’s Dead Letters Depot, where thirty letter detectives work hard, trying to put together whatever clues they can find to reunite the letters with their recipients. William Woolf is one of those detectives. Since 1979, after inheriting the position from his uncle, he’s been working in the depot and he is the right man at the right place. He has his own way of choosing the letters, and one day he finds a midnight blue envelope addressed to “My Great Love”. He’s intrigued. The letters are written by a woman to a man she has never met but feels he’s her soul mate and she hopes to meet him one day. William is fascinated and starts to think they are meant for him, and so he sets his mind on finding this woman. Only he doesn’t take into consideration that his marriage to Claire already is like walking on thin ice. After a great beginning, it looks like they are both living separate lives.

The characters were really well drawn and full of personality. They were full of flaws actually, and gradually and slowly we are made aware of the problems that lie between them. William and Claire simply stopped to communicate and the result is that their marriage became stale and unhappy. William actually felt better among his letters – this is my personal feeling, and while his compassion, dedication and interest were directed towards the letters, his own marriage, real life is suffering. He was more of a loner, and a dreamer in my opinion, feeling much more comfortable with his letters than in his real life.
William was really passionate about his job, and this passion has started already when he was a young boy, filling his notebook with stories from the letters, and some of those stories became a kind of obsession to him, I think we can say this. He doesn’t see them as normal letters but he sees the story behind them, he sees people that send them and who are waiting to receive them. His personal favourites were the one categorized as Supernatural Division, it means letters addressed to God, mythic and mystics.

There were some gorgeous stories contained in those lost letters. They were funny, they were personal, they were heart – breaking and heart – melting. Some were hilarious, some were poignant but they were for sure the strongest part of the book. The book also told us about William and Clare’s relationship, about their highs and lows but I must admit that I had a feeling that these are the letters that are the real main storyline. They were stories of love, grief, loss and hope, beautifully capturing human nature and relationships, feelings and emotions.

It was a story about love that went wrong, about hope, lost communication, disappointment, second chances and a great deal more. It was rather a sad read, realistic and poignant. I had a feeling that the ending is a bit too rushed, especially compared to the rest of the book that was rather moderate in pace, and to be totally honest, I’m still not sure how I feel about it. The author shows great insight into all areas that she writes about, let it be the letters, the stories, the relationships, exploring ups and downs, highs and lows of life and reality. The writing style is lyrical and eloquent but still easy to follow. Altogether, I enjoyed “The Lost Letters of William Woolf”, it was a read with a difference and I hope to read more from the author soon.

 

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The Evidence Against You by Gillian McAllister

The Evidence Against You by Gillian McAllister

 

39940912Publisher: Penguin

Publishing Date: 18th April  2019

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 422

Genre: Mystery, Crime, Thriller

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

DON’T MISS THE BRAND-NEW THRILLER FROM THE BESTSELLING AUTHOR OF EVERYTHING BUT THE TRUTH AND ANYTHING YOU DO SAY

It’s the day her father will be released from jail. Izzy English has every reason to feel conflicted – he’s the man who gave her a childhood filled with happy memories. But he has also just served seventeen years for the murder of her mother.

Now, Izzy’s father sends her a letter. He wants to talk, to defend himself against each piece of evidence from his trial. But should she give him the benefit of the doubt? Or is her father guilty as charged, and luring her into a trap?

People can’t get enough of Gillian McAllister’s psychological thrillers . . .

 

 

my-review

 

Izzy’s father was found guilty of her mother’s murder and sentenced. Fast forward 18 years and he’s being released now and of course gets in touch with his daughter to profess his innocence. Izzy doesn’t know what to think – he was sentenced, so he was found guilty but he’s also her father that he misses terribly, a father who gave her a childhood filled with plenty of happy, unforgettable moments – but he also murdered her mother! Part of her believes him, so she decides to give him a chance and together they try to uncover the truth – what has really happened and is Gabe as innocent as he says?

I think that after hearing brilliant things about Gillian McAllister, I was simply expecting a book that will blow me away, however “The Evidence Against You” left me with mixed feelings. I, of course, appreciated how deceitful the story was. Throughout the book, along the way, Izzy starts to dig deeper and deeper and finds out that things are much more complicated that they seemed at first, that her mother has kept secrets and lied, but well, the dead can’t defend themselves, right, so it was really confusing for her to decide who to trust, her late mother or her father, and I wouldn’t like to put myself in her shoes to be honest.

I couldn’t engage with the characters in a way that I like to. I was not sure what to think about them, what to make of them. Izzy seemed so emotionless, detached, she lived day after day but she didn’t enjoy her life, she used to keep secrets all the time and from everybody, for no reasons really and she didn’t feel very well rounded. But in the end I was really glad to see that she eventually found the courage to come out of her shell, to do this what makes her happy, to see her relaxed and happy with her life again.

The book grows on you in time though, and even though the characters may not be your favourite ones, I was immersed in the events and the clever plot. I was intrigued to see if Gabe was telling the truth, because of course the author has cared for it not to be too straightforward, she gave us plenty of options and situations to make up our minds, though I found myself changing my own all the time. I simply wasn’t sure who I can trust, and there was a moment or two that I also started to doubt in Izzy herself, gah. As for Gabe again, I had a feeling that he tries to manipulate and really, till the end I found I can’t relax around him.

I really liked how the author gave us the possibility to look at different evidence and see how it works for the different involved sides and people – that was a very clever move from her! It was thrilling to see how one word, one sentence, can change your mind or point you in totally different direction, make you think and sometimes over think. However, there came a moment that it started to feel a little too repetitive, when Izzy was starting to believe in her father innocence and then discovering something that made her – again! – withdrew from contact with him, and then the same pattern repeating itself. Perhaps this is why I found the story progressing very slowly and sometimes I had a feeling that we’re simply not moving ahead.

Nevertheless, the final reveal surprised me, though I am still not my sure what my feelings about it are. On one hand, the author has brilliantly tangled up all the threads, skilfully hidden all the tips that were there for those with eagle eyes (sadly, not me then) but on the other I felt, I don’t know, lukewarm? Disappointed? Also, there was too less tension for me, I just didn’t feel there was any big mystery to be solved, that there was something really bad going to happen. But on the whole I loved how the author has written the story, with the reader (me) being torn between wanting Gabe to be innocent and then believing he most certainly isn’t. It was dark and thought – provoking and I am looking forward to read Gillian McAllister’s previous books.

 

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No Way Out by Cara Hunter / Blog Tour

No Way Out by Cara Hunter

 

39805700Publisher: Penguin

Publishing Date: 18th April  2019

Series: DI Adam Fowley #3

Source:  Received from the publisher, thank you!

Number of pages: 360

Genre: Mystery, Crime, Thriller

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

DID YOU SEE ANYTHING ON THE NIGHT THE ESMOND FAMILY WERE MURDERED?

From the author of CLOSE TO HOME and IN THE DARK comes the third pulse-pounding DI Fawley crime thriller.

It’s one of the most disturbing cases DI Fawley has ever worked.

The Christmas holidays, and two children have just been pulled from the wreckage of their burning home in North Oxford. The toddler is dead, and his brother is soon fighting for his life.

Why were they left in the house alone? Where is their mother, and why is their father not answering his phone?

Then new evidence is discovered, and DI Fawley’s worst nightmare comes true.

Because this fire wasn’t an accident.

It was murder.

Rating: four-stars

 

Michael and Samantha Esmond and their two children live in a large house in an expensive part of Oxford. On New Year the fire brigade is called to their property and when they arrive, it’s already engulfed by flames. Two children are being found, three year old Zachary and his older brother Matty. However, there is no sign of the parents, it looks like the children were left alone at home. What’s worse is the fact that all the evidence points to the fire having been started deliberately, of it being an arson. The police and fire investigating team start to investigate.

This, what at the beginning looked like a simple case, turned out into something full of twists, turns, red herrings and puzzles along the way. The story is told “before” and “after”, so we slowly start to find out what has happened on the day of the fire. The events from few months before intertwine with the current police investigation and what emerges is a picture of the family that isn’t necessary happy, as we get to know their dynamics. Actually, it was like peeling away the layers, with each layer revealing more and more, until we get direct into the heart of the event.

No Way Out” is the third book in the DI Adam Fowley series and the first one read by yours truly – no idea how I’ve missed on it, to be honest, though I’m sure that the two previous novels hide somewhere in my never – ending TBR pile – and I had some reservations before reading it, not knowing if it can be read as a stand – alone. Well, the verdict is, yes it can. I haven’t got a feeling that I’m lost, that I’m missing something, the cameos were enough. Though yes, at the beginning I felt really confused with all those DIs, DSs, who was who before and was there someone degraded?

It took me some time to get used to the way it was narrated, as it was told in the first person present and third person past, and at the beginning I wasn’t sure who it is that’s talking to me, but then I simply got used to it, got into the story, felt invested in the characters’ lives so I also didn’t have any more problems. I truly liked the way the author mixed police statements and telephone transcripts, news and social media – it felt so realistic, dynamic and sharp.

This was a captivating, heart – breaking and also sad read, and the relaxed banter from Adam’s team, that occasionally was there to relieve the tension only shows how skilful the author is in planning her novel. It was, for me at least, full of twists, turns and surprises, but I would never make a good investigator, so there, and of course I couldn’t guess the outcome, but this is only a huge bonus point for the book. It dealt with a truly poignant case, and I really appreciated the way the author tackled all those issues – always when children are involved it needs this special, gentle touch and Cara Hunter provided us with it. The author’s writing style is refreshing and very modern, which makes the reading this bit faster. I can only highly recommend this domestic – noir police procedural.

 

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