The Little Bakery on Rosemary Lane by Ellen Berry

The Little Bakery on Rosemary Lane by Ellen Berry

 

33939393Publisher: Avon

Publishing Date: 7th September 2017

Series: Rosemary Lane #2 (read my review of Book 1 here)

Source:  Received from the publisher in return for an honest review, thank you!

Number of pages: 368

Genre:  Women’s Fiction, General Fiction (Adult)

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Paperback

 

Synopsis:

If you want to move forward, sometimes you have to go back …
Prepare to fall in love with beautiful village of Burley Bridge.

Growing up in a quiet Yorkshire village, Roxanne couldn’t wait to escape and find her place in the world in London. As a high-powered fashion editor she lives a glamorous life of perennial singlehood – or so it seems to her sister Della. But when Roxanne gets her heart broken by a fashion photographer, she runs away, back to Della’s welcoming home above her bookshop in Burley Bridge.

But Burley Bridge, Roxanne discovers, is even quieter than she remembered. There’s nothing to do, so Roxanne agrees to walk Della’s dog Stanley. It’s on these walks that Roxanne makes a startling discovery: the people who live in Burley Bridge are, well, just people – different from the fashion set she’s used to, but kind and even interesting. Michael, a widower trying to make a go of a small bakery, particularly so. Little by little, cupcake by cupcake, Roxanne and Michael fall into a comforting friendship.

Could there be a life for Roxanne after all, in the place she’s spent 46 years trying to escape?

Rating: three-stars

 

“The Little Bakery on Rosemary Lane” is the second book in the Rosemary Lane by Ellen Berry series but it can easily be read as a stand – alone. The book mentions some of the characters from the previous novel but it entirely focuses on a new character, Roxanne. She has left Yorkshire as a teenager, and now she’s in her late forties and loves her work as a fashion editor. She’s passionate about her job, and she’s also successful, she has great ideas and she knows what it is the readers of the magazine want to see. However, there are some changes to come in the magazine and it’s a little unsettling – as well as her relationship she’s in starts to shake the foundations. So Roxanne decides to go back to Yorkshire where her sister Della still lives – Della, the one who owns the cookbook shop from the previous book.

This story started so, so well! I was doing the virtual high – fives because it was feeling like reading the good, old Fiona Gibson again – the writing was so warm and engaging, the story was flowing and I was incredibly caught up in the story. However, the more I got into the book, the slower and flatter it felt. There was not much happening and I had a feeling it is very repetitive and in the end I found myself skipping some of the passages and even a chapter or two – I am very sorry for this but it just didn’t keep my attention. Then there is the same thing as with the first book in the series, “The Bookshop on Rosemary Lane” – the bookshop is in the title, as is the bakery in this book, but they are not the huge part of the story, the bakery hardly features in this story and it’s just misleading.

I did like Roxanne. She was a great leading character. She was very passionate about her job, you could really feel she loves what she does and that she feels comfortable in her own skin. She was creative, and I always love this in characters. However, she finds herself at the crossroads right now, what with big changes at work and some troubles in love paradise, and we accompany her on her journey to find out what she really wants.
I really liked how Roxanne started to see that she really likes the countryside and that there is much more to living there as she thought, even though she sometimes learn to like it in the hard way, like going for a walk with the dog totally unprepared and dressed in very unsuitable clothes. It was nice to see her changing, making new friends, helping at the shop and feeling well in her own skin.

The London part of the book was really good, fast – paced and I totally enjoyed it. However, the Yorkshire part, while really important, as it was the time that Roxanne – of course! – started to change and see what she wants, was for me a little too flat, too slow, too meh. It was a tad predictable and some things, such like the later changes at Roxanne’s magazine, felt much too rushed and much too clichéd and obvious.

Altogether, “The Little Bakery on the Rosemary Lane” was a warm, lovely story. It felt modern and up – to – date and it lovely mixed the world of fashion with cookbooks and fresh, tasty bread. It was about making your own choices, about not letting others to influence you, seeing you can really take the risk. It was an easy, pleasant read with a low – key romance and even though I maybe didn’t love it as much as I initially thought, it was still pleasant enough and I am looking forward the third book in the series.

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Coming Home to the Comfort Food Cafe by Debbie Johnson

Coming Home to the Comfort Food Cafe by Debbie Johnson

 

35215800Publisher: HarperImpulse

Publishing Date: 8th October 2017

Series: Comfort Food Cafe #3 (read my review of Book 1 here and Book 2 here)

Source:  Received from the publisher via NetGalley in return for an honest review, thank you!

Number of pages: 400

Genre:  Women’s Fiction, Literature/Fiction (Adult)

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Paperback

 

 

Synopsis:

Come home to the Comfort Food Café and cosy up with a mug of hot chocolate and an extra sprinkle of romance!

When Zoe’s best friend Kate dies of breast cancer, her whole world is turned upside down. Within hours, she goes from being the wacky neighbour who can barely keep a houseplant alive to a whole new world of responsibility when she realises she’s guardian to Kate’s 15-year-old daughter, Martha.

Moving to the little village of Budbury, Zoe hopes the fresh Dorset sea breeze and the gentle pace of life will help them heal.

Luckily for them both, the friendly community at the Comfort Food Cafe provide listening ears, sage advice, shoulders to cry on, and some truly excellent carrot cake. And when Martha’s enigmatic, absent father suddenly turns up, confusing not only Martha but Zoe too, the love and friendship of their new friends is the best present they could have asked for…

Rating: five-stars

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Oh my word, guys, you have no idea how much I loved “Coming Home to the Comfort Food Cafe”! I simply adored it with all my heart and my whole little miserable life, and I really can’t describe how great it was to be back to the Comfort Food Cafe, Budbury and all the brilliant villagers, old or new. The Comfort Food Cafe series, in fact, is up there, very very high, on the favourite series shelf, together with the Walshs by Marian Keyes and The Proper Family by Chrissie Manby and I really don’t want to end.
You can read this book as a stand – alone, as it introduces as to brand new characters that are going to break your heart and full it with the warmest feelings at the same time, but I highly, highly recommend to read all of the books in the series because they are simply brilliant and it is always such a great feeling to catch up with all the regular, old characters.

The story is split into four parts, and each of them is full to brims with beautiful descriptions, bad and good things happening, tears and laughter. Within those four parts we can see how much affect The Comfort Food Cafe is having on Zoe and Martha, how they change, open and find their place. But of course this story is not only about Zoe and Martha, and I was over the moon with joy to see and hear the latest from Laura, Becca, Cheri, Edie and their other halves. They didn’t change one iota, thanks God, they are still as warm and welcoming as ever, and they still know what is needed to help the new kids on the block to see happiness again.

The characters are, as always, spiky, bubbly and real and they feel like 3D people. They are quirky, they are fun, they are full of compassion and I would love to have such Comfort Food Cafe nearby. There is this brilliant and warm feeling of community spirit. Zoe and Martha, the two main characters this time, are so beautifully written, they are down to earth and genuine with all of their emotions. Martha is the typical teenager but you cannot dislike her, you sympathize with her, with the way she copes with her grief, and her being so sarcastic and awkward rings such a bell. The interactions between Zoe and Martha are fabulous and also genuine – the author has got so easily into their heads and put all of their feelings into words. Zoe is so authentic, and she deserves a standing ovation for being as she is, what with her chaotic and shaky childhood.

The story mentions good as well as tough times of Zoe and Martha, and it is incredible how very well it is balanced, how well the author knows when to add a poignant moment and when to brighten the atmosphere, and let’s just mention the welcoming party or the Christmas Talent Show. There is so much feeling and understanding to the words and even when Debbie Johnson writes about dogs sitting on Cal’s feet, hoping for something to eat, it is written in such a way that you could easily picture this and feel the warmth in those words. This novel is full of twists and turns and surprises, there are so many threads in there but they all mesh really well, they get together brilliantly and as a result we get a wonderful story without a single flat moment, but also that is not overdone.

I’ve no idea how Debbie Johnson manages to capture and put into words all the emotions and feelings: of disappointment, anger, hope, love, despair and exasperation – but she does it in a brilliant way. It was so honest, so genuine that I really had goose bumps, it touched upon all my right heart – strings and it doesn’t happen often, guys, only very few authors can do this, and Debbie Johnson belongs to them.

Debbie Johnson’s writing style is one of a kind, she draws the reader into the story from the very first page and I found myself racing through the pages, but not wanting this book to end. This story is so beautifully written, it’s full of layers, it’s deep and incredibly funny at the same time, and full of unforgettable characters and situations, friendship and the overwhelming feeling of being welcome. It’s bittersweet, and it is very honest and raw but there is also this incredibly uplifting, optimistic side to it. You can feel the love, the friendship and hope and it is great. It made me laugh out loud and cry like a baby, and it evoke all kind of emotions in me. It is Debbie Johnson at her best, though I could have mentioned it once or twice in my previous reviews? Very highly recommended!

Guest Post by Angus Donald

Hi guys! Today is the say when the new historical fiction series novel Blood’s Game by thebloods-game-by-angus-donald bestselling author, Angus Donald, is published.  What makes this novel particularly interesting is that Angus Donald is a distant relative of the protagonist, Col. Thomas Blood who famously stole the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London in 1671 – brilliant, no? I am incredibly looking towards reading the book but in the meantime I have a guest post from the author!

 

The court of Charles II: mistresses, mischief and merry-making

By Angus Donald
I’ve always enjoyed a little debauchery – I don’t get to indulge so much these days, now that I’m middle-aged and married with two young kids, but I’ve done more than my fair share of wild partying over the years. And I must admit that it was partly this deplorable character failing that drew me to write about the Restoration period and the “Merry Monarch” Charles II – it sounded like a hell of a lot of fun!

My new novel Blood’s Game, a tale about the attempt by Colonel Thomas Blood to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London, opens in 1670, ten years after Charles was restored to his thrones in the Three Kingdoms of England, Scotland and Ireland. Once back in power after a long penniless exile, the King was determined to have a really good time. He travelled back to London from the Kentish coast in a glittering procession, dressed in a silver tunic, his path strewn with fragrant herbs by beautiful maidens, the public fountains in the capital all running with wine. He continued this display of largesse throughout his reign; he spent money he didn’t have on fabulous masked balls, parties and banquets for his friends, he bought rare jewels and thoroughbred race horses, he gave extravagant gifts and grants of lands to his many mistresses and their offspring – by 1670 he owned eleven royal yachts and was about to buy another for his unhappy Portuguese wife Catherine.

His ministers tried to rein in his spending but, even though he received more than a million pounds a year from Parliament, his expenditure always far outstripped his income. But, as Charles says in Blood’s Game: “A certain carelessness with his finances befits a monarch. I refuse to scrimp and snivel like some damned pauper.”

The King was deliberate about this policy of having fun: the Three Kingdoms had just come out of a long dark period when the bloody civil wars were followed by the Puritan rule of the Commonwealth and Oliver Cromwell. During the austere interregnum period, most sports were banned, drunkenness and even swearing was punished with a fine, non-religious expressions of Christmas were stopped, many inns were closed, as were all the theatres, women caught working on Sundays were put in the stocks, bright clothes were banned and make-up was scrubbed off girls’ faces by soldiers who caught them wearing it, right there and then. Armed men humiliating women in the streets in the name of religious purity does not only happen in other parts of the world. We had our own approximation of the Taliban once.

So, when Charles returned to the throne, he wanted to show his subjects that it was now perfectly all right for people to enjoy themselves. Hip hip hooray! The theatres were reopened, and there was a resurgence of bawdy, satirical plays. Public drunkenness, particularly among the aristocracy, was so commonplace as to be almost a badge of rank. Pranks and japes abounded – a pair of well-born young men, friends of the King and members of the notorious Merry Gang, scandalised London by appearing on a balcony and pretending to sodomise each other. Poets and playwrights could openly criticise the King, his court, his morals and his mistresses. And did so enthusiastically. The drunken poet John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester, leader of the Merry Gang, wrote of the King in one satire: “Restless he rolls from whore to whore/ A merry monarch, scandalous and poor”

Because Charles took his sexual pleasures seriously, too. He had many lovers as a young bachelor, including his nanny Mrs Wyndham, who took his virginity when he was fifteen. And after he married Catherine of Braganza, in 1662, he had at least seven mistresses, and possible as many as thirteen, who bore him a dozen children.

The role of mistress was semi-official – a whore or courtesan, or woman with whom the King had a casual encounter, would not counted among their number – and a man who kept one was obliged to pay for her food, drink, accommodation and servants, as well as making her generous presents from time to time, perhaps when he paid them a visit. Many of the mistresses and their illegitimate children, whose paternity the King acknowledged, received earldoms and dukedoms from the King – and many of British aristocrats alive today trace their ancestry back to Charles II.

Two of the the most famous of Charles’s mistresses – the formidable beauty Barbara Villiers, Duchess of Cleveland, and the famous actress Nell Gywn – make appearances in Blood’s Game. In the period when the book is set, Barbara was about thirty and was being replaced in the royal affections by the feisty and outrageous Nell, who was ten years younger. Gwyn was an actress, and before that an “orange-seller” in the theatres, a profession which some historians take as a euphemism for prostitute. Perhaps because of her lowly origins and dubious trade, she was never ennobled by her royal lover, although her two children were.

Barbara, on the other hand, came from the noble Villiers family. She gave Charles five children and, as a long-time and fecund mistress, she wielded more power at court than childless Catherine. In fact, she was known as the Uncrowned Queen and she used her position ruthlessly to enrich herself and her friends. She persuaded the King to grant her lavish titles and lands and properties – she was given  Nonsuch Palace, built by Henry VIII, and the title Baroness Nonsuch, and promptly dismantled the palace and sold off the building materials to pay her gambling debts. She “borrowed” tens of thousands of pounds from the Privy Purse, and when this was discovered, the debt was immediately forgiven by her indulgent lover Charles.

When Charles’s interest in her began to wane, she was not above finding other gentlemen friends to amuse her. She became the lover of Jack Churchill, the future Duke of Marlborough, when he was a handsome and penniless young officer at court. She bore Churchill a daughter and tried, unsuccessfully, to claim she was the King’s.

Charles was not exactly delighted that his long-time lover, a woman he had given so much to, had taken a younger man to her bed – Barbara had given Churchill a gift of £5,000, money she had received from the King, which infuriated Charles – but he was perfectly gentlemanly about the situation. He was, after all, beginning his relationship with Nell Gwyn at the time. There is a (probably apocryphal) tale, which I have included in Blood’s Game, that a servant was paid £100 by the Duke of Buckingham to inform His Grace when Churchill and Villiers would next be enjoying a lovers’ tryst. The mischief-making Duke then persuaded the King to visit Barbara at the same time. The story goes that when the King arrived unexpectedly, the naked Churchill had to hide in a cupboard, and was discovered there by the Merry Monarch.

Apparently, the King saw the funny side, and forgave his love rival. He said: “You are a rascal, sir, but I forgive you because you do it to get your [daily] bread.”

A stinging insult – basically calling Churchill a man-whore – then forgiveness. And never losing your sense of humour. That’s pure class in my book. And the lusty King even hung around to pleasure his old mistress after young Churchill had gone.

How could writing about a monarch like that, and chronicling his court of drunken, debauched and promiscuous hangers-on, not be the most tremendous fun?

I hope you find reading Blood’s Game just as enjoyable.

Death in the Stars by Frances Brody

Death in the Stars by Frances Brody

 

35172597Publisher: Piatkus

Publishing Date: 5th October 2017

Series: Kate Shackleton #9

Source:  Received from the publisher in return for an honest review!

Number of pages: 400

Genre:  Mystery, Crime

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Paperback

 

 

 

Synopsis:

Yorkshire, 1927. Eclipse fever grips the nation, and when beloved theatre star Selina Fellini approaches trusted sleuth Kate Shackleton to accompany her to a viewing party at Giggleswick School Chapel, Kate suspects an ulterior motive.

During the eclipse, Selina’s friend and co-star Billy Moffatt disappears and is later found dead in the chapel grounds. Kate can’t help but dig deeper and soon learns that two other members of the theatre troupe died in similarly mysterious circumstances in the past year. With the help of Jim Sykes and Mrs Sugden, Kate sets about investigating the deaths – and whether there is a murderer in the company.

When Selina’s elusive husband Jarrod, injured in the war and subject to violent mood swings, comes back on the scene, Kate begins to imagine something far deadlier at play, and wonders just who will be next to pay the ultimate price for fame . . .

 
Rating: four-stars

 

I adore Frances Brody’s Kate Shackleton series and am always looking toward the new release. “Death at the Stars” is already the 9th book in the series, however it can easily be read as a stand – alone, and it is also the perfect book to start the series if you haven’t read the previous books yet.

This book is written in the same, gentle way that Frances Brody has got me used to. The narration is engaging and rich, and the author tangled and muddled the facts in such a clever way, adding tips but also complicating things, and I found myself suspecting every single character in the book – and I think it is a sign of a great author to be able to complicate the things but not overdo them, to throw red herrings at the right space and in the right moments, and as a result we got a very decent cosy murder mystery.

This time the fate takes Kate Shackleton to dressing rooms and theatre performances, and guys, I loved the descriptions of all of this. The author has again brought the 1920’s London and Yorkshire to life and brilliantly captured the atmosphere of those times. Those glimpses into the theatre life, the different acts and performances, into the lives of the artists in the roaring 1920’s were brilliant.
Kate Shackleton is, as always, ahead of her times. She’s clever, intelligent and she knows what questions to ask and where to look. Of course we couldn’t have missed her helping hands Mrs. Sugden and Jim Sykes, and it was such a great, comfortable feeling to be in their company again. The way Kate investigates is adorable. She’s thorough, she is able to see all the necessary details that can help her and it really wasn’t just until the very end that I realised who the villain is – the author has really well played with my mind.

Even though this time this novel has missed on this Frances Brody’s hallmark sparkle, this lovely and hooking Kate Shackleton’s feeling (yup. In my opinion it was a little on the flat side this time, please don’t get me wrong, basically everything was fair enough with this story, all the right questions were asked, the investigation was interesting and full of surprises but there was something that just didn’t sit with me so much), I still enjoyed it. What bothered me a little was the great number of characters – I was never sure if they’re going to be significant, very significant or not significant at all.

Altogether, “Death in the Stars” was a charming story, just as all the others in the series that I had pleasure to read. It is glamorous, it is cosy and it is clever and gentle. The mystery is masterfully written and the story itself is full of surprises and turns and this is this kind of book that you can read anytime, no matter what mood you’re in or what’s the weather – I am already looking forward Kate’s new adventures.

The Cotswolds Cookery Club: A Taste of France by Alice Ross

The Cotswolds Cookery Club: A Taste of France by Alice Ross

 

35704717Publisher: HQ Digital

Publishing Date: 27th September  2017

Series: The Cotswolds Cookery Club #3 (read my review of Book 1  here and Book 2 here  )

Source:  Received from the publisher via NetGalley in return for an honest review!

Number of pages: 180

Genre:  Humour, Romance

 Buy the Book: Kindle

 

 

Synopsis:

Too many men spoil the broth…?

Kate Harris has enough on her plate! Life is constant juggling act between raising her three young children and running a busy Veterinary Practice in the Cotswolds. But with her passion for all things French, especially the mouth-watering cuisine, the cookery club with her three best friends, Connie, Melody and Trish is the perfect escape…

Now the foursome has been given their biggest challenge yet! Yet, with her husband Andrew’s increasingly secretive behaviour, the unexpected reappearance of her dishy ex-boyfriend, Gregg, and an unexpected culinary challenge from her daughter’s nursery, Kate decides it’s time to take charge of the disparate ingredients of her life and transform them into the perfect pot-au-feu!

Fans of Milly Johnson, Caroline Roberts and Jill Mansell will love this heart-warming read.

The Cotswolds Cookery Club is a story told in three parts. A Taste of France is part three.

Rating: three-half-stars

 

“A Taste of France” is the third and final instalment in the Cotswolds Cookery Club by Alice Ross series, though if it were for me the series could go on and on – I would love to hear what’s happening with this small but tight group of friends.

This part tells us more about Kate, the incredibly busy mum of three, and about the unfinished business of hers from the previous books. As in the previous two parts, we are treated to some incredibly delicious sounding recipes that the cookery club is making, and this time they took us on a very yummy journey to France. The descriptions of the food made not only my mouth water but only thinking about them now makes me hungry.

In this part I had a feeling it is a little too flat for my liking, with many repetitions and I felt as if we were going to in circles. It doesn’t mean it is not good, because of course it is, it is full of warmth, some hilarious situations as well but if you twisted my arm I’d have to admit that it was my last favourite part. Also, I would love to see the twins this little bit better brought up, I really felt the pain of Kate’s daughter and I myself wanted to cry, and not laugh, at their antics. They weren’t funny, they were out – of – control children.

Altogether, it was a lovely, uplifting and quick read about the power of friendship and trust. The characters were great, the way they interacted together felt honest and I really liked the fact that the women are there for each other, no matter what. All three parts were feel – good and uplifting – recommended!

Blackberry Picking at Jasmine Cottage by Zara Stoneley

Blackberry Picking at Jasmine Cottage by Zara Stoneley

 

34875719Publisher: HarperImpulse

Publishing Date: 22nd September 2017

Series: Love in Langtry Meadows #2 (read my review of book #1 here )

Source:  Received from the publisher via NetGalley in return for an honest review!

Number of pages: 339

Genre:  Romance, Women’s Fiction

 Buy the Book: Kindle | Paperback (out on 30.11.2017)

 

 

Synopsis:

Return to the charming little village of Langtry Meadows and cosy up by the fire with this gorgeous romance that will warm your heart…

As the lazy days of summer ebb away and the hedgerows fill with rich, plump blackberries, Lucy Jacobs couldn’t be happier. She’s feeling more and more at home in the small village of Langtry Meadows and has fallen in love with idyllic Jasmine cottage – not to mention gorgeous vet Charlie.

But just as Lucy is thinking about putting down roots like the blackberries that grow in her garden, Charlie’s ex returns and threatens to put a thorn in their perfect life…

Rating: five-stars

 

Guys. What a lovely feeling it was, to be back at Langtry Meadows with the characters from “Summer with the Country Village Vet”! It was so great that we didn’t have to wait too long for the second book in the series, and as “Blackberry Picking at Jasmine Cottage” started off exactly where we left, it was so easy to immediately get comfortable and enjoy the novel immensely.
Because guys, there is no other option than enjoy this book! I’ll probably repeat myself in this review but Zara Stoneley has such a huge talent to write welcoming, warm, down – to – earth and funny stories, with the best characters in the world. We are back with the incredibly laid back Lucy, the sexiest vet ever Charlie (can you hear me roar?), Maisie, Sally, Jim, Elsie, Trish and many, many other colourful and wonderful characters that we remember from book number one.

This novel was packed full with events yet it never felt too overdone, which must be an art itself. There were dramas aplenty but also many, many, many relaxing and hilarious situations usually involving animals and children, and Zara Stoneley can write both brilliantly well. There is not a single moment flat and I was so caught up in the lives of the characters that I didn’t want to put the book away. The author has in such a great way written about Maisie and how hard it was for her to come to terms with the fact that her mum is right now absent from her life, and she wonderfully captured all those feelings and emotions of a little girl. Don’t get me wrong, Charlie and Lucy of course did whatever they could that Maisie felt loved but still her mum was not there and she felt so alone, and my heart was breaking in thousand little pieces when I saw her so sad. Then of course we have this brilliant, lovely close knit community that support each other no matter what – they just go along so easily, in such a natural, genuine way. There are also some secrets being kept in the story and some closures as well and it all just works perfectly together.

Reading the book was for me like sitting under my favourite blanket, in front of the fireplace with a mug of hot chocolate with a whipped cream and marshmallows – it was absolutely a bliss and I can’t wait for a book 3 in the series. There was this so hard to capture cosy and warm feeling and I truly didn’t want this story to end. I think that Zara Stoneley’s writing and stories just get better and better and each of her books is a real treat for me, as I know that she’s always going to deliver this what I’m looking for. I highly recommend “Blackberry Picking at Jasmine Cottage”!

The Woolly Hat Knitting Club by Poppy Dolan

The Woolly Hat Knitting Club by Poppy Dolan

 

36199960Publisher: Canelo

Publishing Date: 25th September 2017

Source:  Received from the publisher via NetGalley in return for an honest review!

Number of pages: 260

Genre:  Romance, Women’s Fiction

 Buy the Book: Kindle

 

 

 

Synopsis:

Finding happiness one stitch at a time

When Dee Blackthorn’s brother, JP, breaks both wrists not only is he in need of a helping hand – or two – but the knitting shop he owns can’t function. Sisterly duties take Dee away from her demanding job and she is unceremoniously fired amidst rumours of inappropriate behaviour. Dee is certain that her hot-shot nemesis, Ben, is behind it all but has no proof.

When Dee bumps into an old friend who is new mum to a premature baby she convinces JP to enlist his knitting pals to make lots of tiny woolly hats. Then Ben turns up denying involvement in Dee’s sacking and she ropes him into helping the knitting cause.

But before long Dee’s good intentions backfire and she risks losing her friends, her family and Ben, who’s turned out to be not so bad after all…

A feel-good romantic comedy about learning what life is really all about, The Woolly Hat Knitting Club is perfect for fans of Cathy Bramley, Tilly Tennant and Carole Matthews.

Rating: four-stars

 

Poppy Dolan is back again with her new novel “The Woolly Hat Knitting Club”, and even though knitting is totally not my thing (but I have other talents, really!), it IS Poppy Dolan’s book and I requested it without hesitation – I fell in love with her books some time ago and I am incredibly happy that after a long break she’s back with her second book this year – keep them coming, Poppy!

The story started very promising and engaging, with Dee being very suddenly being fired from her beloved job. Then I think it went a little downhill and slowed down a bit but I was still caught up in the novel and kept my fingers crossed for (almost) everybody. Dee has really gone on a journey of self – developing and finding her priorities, becoming a new person in short. She had a passion, when she did something she put all her heart into it and she loved her family. She didn’t hesitate for a single moment to leave behind her life in London when her younger brother JP breaks both his wrists and needs help. Actually, this is where her new life starts – even if she doesn’t know it yet herself! What we don’t know about JP yet is that he’s a knitter, runs a blog and the crafting gangs out there just love him. Dee doesn’t knit. At all. But she’s still there to help him, especially as after a chance encounter with her school friend Becky Dee realises they can help! So then we follow her, JP and some of their friends (and enemies) bringing the challenge to life.

I admit, I had some problems to get into the book. I mean, all this knitting, the structure and colours of the yarn, descriptions of needles or whatever the right name is, and generally, there was something keeping me back, but fortunately this overwhelming feel – good factor, the positivity and the wonderful message took over and I just simply started to enjoy this book. It was so warm that you just can’t not like it, and I really am not sure what my problem was.

We see Dee changing, seeing there are other things that count in life than work, seeing different perspectives, and I enjoyed watching her realising all those things. I always like such characters that set their priorities right. Actually, all of the characters are really well drawn. They are down to earth, they have their battles and struggles and they really feel realistic. They play their parts well and there is enough personality in all of them to like them and fell for them, even though their futures are a little bit predictable.

“The woolly Hat Knitting Club” was a lovely story about realising the importance of a family and friends with a beautiful message in it, also touching upon issues that are so important but not often talked about such as premature babies. It is thoughtful but also light – hearted and easy to read, fun and poignant and I simply liked it. It was written in a lovely, warm way and actually, it was all I was expecting from this book. Recommended!